GM LS1 for marine use

Discussion in 'DIY Marinizing' started by daniel2, Nov 23, 2005.

  1. matthewfnorbert
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    matthewfnorbert Junior Member

    yes julious i too are very keen to see some pics of your exhaust manifolds, in particular how you handle the o2 sensor. (although not required for our jet application it would to some degree be useful for a prop boat).

    pls post some pics..
     
  2. julius750
    Joined: Feb 2006
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    julius750 Junior Member

    All V6 V8 Chev Ford Chrysler Buick Lexus GM etc type stainless Manifolds look similar from side on, but have different riser height, diameter, angles and brackets (if any). Some replacements for end riser types have a stainless adaptor pipe from the Manifold to line up with the original outlet. O2 sensors ports shown on supercharged Commodore (GM) engine manifolds.
     

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  3. ozjet
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: Australia-Thursday Island

    ozjet New Member

    LS1-Newbie

    Hi evryone, looks like I have found the right place for info: I just bought a complete LS1 GenIII engine/transmission package and plan to fit into my 18'Sidewinder with JC Berkeley. My old 455 Olds needs some serious repair and I thought I play around with the LS1 for a while. Have no idea what I am doing, still have to figure out the coupling from flywheel to my shaft and want to stay away from CV joints, would like to try polymer coupling, but it would have to tolerate some misalignment. Also have to figure out how to unstall the engine, my old one had a gimbal housing sitting on my jet-unit, so I guess I have to build something for that. Haven't decided what type of fuel pump I will use, nor if I use O2 sensors or not. If anybody has any good ideas, tips or tricks, I really would appreciate it.
     
  4. speedboats
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Location: New Zealand

    speedboats Senior Member

    ozjet... Had you thought of using a universal joint, easy to machine an adaptor block to the flywheel and bolt right on. Try to avoid the centa-flex rubber doughnut type, as the speeds that the LS1 revs makes the mass of the rubber too large and it tends to grow out of shape, or worse fall apart. Remember to check manufacturers specs as to the max revs of any drive component. We tend to use a 'Hardy Spicer' type coupling. 1410 I think is the part spec, a 10 spline yoke at one end and a flange to bolt to the flywheel. You can get them flanged at both ends.
     
  5. julius750
    Joined: Feb 2006
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    Location: Melbourne Australia

    julius750 Junior Member

    LS1 marine manifolds

    If you are still going ahead with this project, we can help with watercooled headers incl o2 sensor ports.
     
  6. ozjet
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: Australia-Thursday Island

    ozjet New Member

    LS1 basic questions

    Thanx for the replys so far. I guess I have to start with the basics: What is the better option to mount a LS1, rubber mounts or solid bolted to stringers? What is the better location for the fuel pum, close to the tank (bow) or close to engine (aft)? Are there any particular fuelpumps that are ideal for that engine? Again, thanx, I can do with a bit of advice.
     
  7. speedboats
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    speedboats Senior Member

    If you have to pump the fuel a long way, then you'll need an high flow pump to suck from the tanks feeding a high pressure pump. The high pressure pump feeds the fuel rail and injectors (around 40 - 60 psi)

    I wouldn't place the high pressure pump at the bow, as you don't really want a long line of fuel under pressure right the length of the boat. Also, the longer the high pressure line, the greater the internal resistance and therefore the less actual pressure at the fuel rail.

    High pressure fuel pumps don't like to suck. Sucking is the number 1 killer of high pressure pumps.

    Rubber mounts would be best, although for a long while we used to solid mount the engine. If you rubber mount the engine, use a 'chock stop'. This is something mechanical (like a chain or similar) that holds the motor in the engine room in event of a collision. What you don't want is the boat to stop in a hurry and the rubber perrish and the motor keeps going. You may hurt or even kill someone. This has happened.
     
  8. jburns
    Joined: May 2011
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    Location: usa

    jburns New Member

    looking for ls1 parts

    Wondering if anyone has anymore information on ls1 conversions. What out drive do they bolt up to? does anyone make a kit? Any help would be a appreciated.
     
  9. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    can't see much trouble daniel. the ls1 is as strong as a marine block seems its already putting out 320 hp. you don't need to build a counter rotating engine you just get a counter rotating box. reduction boxs can be bought in either rotation. why would aluminium be a problem, what are outboards made of. thats what anodes are for. doh; just realised how old this thread is.
     

  10. julius750
    Joined: Feb 2006
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    Location: Melbourne Australia

    julius750 Junior Member

    LS1 conversion

    Bellhousing pattern is standard V8 chev. however any marine installation must run with closed cooling or engine life will be short. I can supply watercooled stainless headers incl o2 sensors to suit Mercruiser Volvo etc sterndrives or any shaft/jet drive configuration.
     
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