Gluing Teflon

Discussion in 'Materials' started by mikereed100, Dec 2, 2008.

  1. mikereed100
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    mikereed100 Junior Member

    Is there a good way to glue Teflon or UHMW to epoxy?

    Mike
     
  2. daiquiri
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    As far as I can recall my school days (long time ago...), no glue will hold teflon.
     
  3. ancient kayaker
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

  4. mikereed100
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    mikereed100 Junior Member

    Thanks Ancient, I got the same results before I posted, but I was kind of hoping someone in the boating world would say "Nah, just goop it up with 5200 and Bob's yer auntie", or something like that, but maybe that's wishfull thinking. Looks like having the stuff etched with sodium and then epoxying is the way to go. Might be better to countersink and screw it, or both.

    Mike
     
  5. ancient kayaker
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    What are you trying to achieve? Can you adapt something that already has Teflon stuck to it, like a non-stick saucepan?

    It sounds crazy I know (madness doesn't run in my family, but it takes a nice stroll around the block once in a while)
     
  6. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Weld it. Yep, that's what I said, weld it.
     
  7. ancient kayaker
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    Er, better use damn good ventilation if you try welding Teflon. Fluorine, Chlorine, Hydrogen Fluoride, a sprinkling of carcinogens, Lord knows what else when it breaks down. I don't think it will actually melt, you can soften it but a heck of a lot of pressure may be needed to make it flow enough to stick to anything. Birds are real sensitive to this stuff, make sure your pet canary is well upwind.

    Were you kidding Par? Or were you referring to UHMW? this link says you can glue UHMW:- http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/uhmw-plastic-3968/#post30481

    Teflon comes in a self-adhesive tape by the way; not sure about UHMW.
     
  8. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You can chemical weld most plastics as well as heat weld. I've done some plastics welding, but never Teflon. You may be able to braze it and use a fairly stuff filler rod to make the joint, if it doesn't like to melt well. Most of my welding has been on ABS, PVC, polyethylene and polypropylene.

    There is also high frequency and ultrasound welding that may work. I'm not sure what would work with Teflon. Dupont would be a likely source for information.
     
  9. Steve W
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    Steve W Senior Member

    Ive not tried glueing Teflon but UHMWPE glues very well with epoxy but you need to modify the surface tension by first sanding it with about 80 grit to give it tooth and then flame treat it, which you can do by running a propane torch over it,then glue it,preferably with a toughened epoxy but your typical boat epoxy will work,just not as well.
    Steve.
     
  10. ancient kayaker
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    Teflon coated glass fiber tapes and cloths can be found on the Internet.
     
  11. mikereed100
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    mikereed100 Junior Member

    I originally asked this question because I am looking at making some "rudders in a drum" for my cat as discussed in the other thread and I am trying to work out the best way to do the bearings. My thought is to make the bearings out of Teflon or UHMWPE strips as Eric has done on Project Amazon. I am leaning towards UHMW due to cost mainly.

    Steve's method sounds interesting and I am thinking that a combination of this and some countersunk stainless fasteners may do the trick. Here is another take (starting at post #4)http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=60952

    I do like the idea of gluing frying pans but unfortunately not practical in this application. :p

    Mike
     
  12. Steve W
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    Steve W Senior Member

    Mike, thanks for the link,very good thread.I use PE whenever i can to create low friction surfaces,in fact in our rudder in a drum system we lined the trunk that the blade slides up and down in with it. What i use is snowboard base material which comes pre sanded and corona treated on one side ready to glue.It is not real thick,maybe 0.050" but very tough and of course slippery.I think PE would be better for your application than Teflon.
    Steve.
     

  13. ancient kayaker
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    Nylon has quite a low coeeficient of friction, is very durable, tolerates water (it absorbs some) and is easy to machine. It is readily available in blocks, strips, sheets etc. That is what I would try.
     
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