Glues

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by DrewHall, Jun 25, 2023.

  1. DrewHall
    Joined: Jun 2019
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    Location: united kingdoms

    DrewHall Junior Member

    Hi,
    I am looking for some feed back on a couple of things, the first one is regarding Epoxy resin glues, I am using the Gurit brand, and mixing it with there brand of Microfibres, when I wish to make a paste.
    Has anyone tried mixed epoxy resin with saw dust or fine shaving to make a paste, instead of using the Microfibres, which are quite expensive, and which if I remember correctly, are just bleach wood fibre.

    The other item I would like some feed back on is the G/Flex Epoxy resin which has some flexibility when cured going by the information online. I was looking on the internet for the best glue to use on Oak, and this one came up. Has anyone any experience of using this glue? or has anyone, used a certain type of glue on Oak that they were impressed with the results?.
     
  2. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Colorado

    Blueknarr Senior Member

    Microfiber is ground to a very consistent and small size.

    Sawdust contains much larger and inconsistently sized particles.
    Sawdust is OK for filling smaller voids. But it's largish particles make sloppy and inconsistent glue joints.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2023
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  3. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    Blueknarr is correct. Sawdust does not have consistent particle sizes and does not make a smooth paste.

    You can use wood flour, as distinguished from sawdust, in many applications however. Wood flour can often be sourced from your wood workshop vacuum cleaner filter. That is the tinier bits that clog the damned filter. For larger amounts, it can be purchased from various suppliers. You can also get better and more consistently sized filler material from your epoxy supplier . There are several names for thickeners. One of them is santocell. They almost all resemble talcum powder and mix well with epoxy or polyester resin.

    If you are tempted to try talcum, which is sometimes composed of zinc stearate, I would advise testing the paste for strength before using on any structural application. All sorts of stuff has been used for thickeners, such as the mineral powder that is used for drywall joint filler. My take on all that is to bite the bullet and get the more appropriate and perhaps more expensive filler that has been proven best for the application. This notion goes along with my belief about paints. If you have busted your hump while doing prep work for paint, then the best quality paint that you can get is not as expensive as all the work you have done with prep and application time that you have expended.

    If you are patching a cow barn, then the quality of the paste may not be a top priority. If you re repairing your classic boat or working on fine furniture then the choice is easy to make. Get the good stuff.
     
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  4. Darkzillicon
    Joined: Jan 2023
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    Location: Palm Beach

    Darkzillicon Senior Member

    Cost of good materials is always a nuisance however you might try shopping around for the correct stuff. I know when I am buying 406 which is basically cabosil its fairly inexpensive compared to the resin used. 5 ounce tubes are around $30 USD and that is for 2.5 gallons or so of epoxy.
     
  5. DrewHall
    Joined: Jun 2019
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    Location: united kingdoms

    DrewHall Junior Member

    Thank you for your reply to my thread, I much appreciate you taking the time, to giving me your feed back, on the question's I posed.
     
  6. DrewHall
    Joined: Jun 2019
    Posts: 8
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    Location: united kingdoms

    DrewHall Junior Member

    Thank you for your reply to my thread, I much appreciate you taking the time, to giving me your feed back, on the question's I posed.
     
  7. DrewHall
    Joined: Jun 2019
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: united kingdoms

    DrewHall Junior Member

    Thank you for your reply to my thread, I much appreciate you taking the time, to giving me your feed back, on the question's I posed.
     
  8. jbo_c
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: Gainesville, GA

    jbo_c Junior Member

    I use sawdust for glues and joints that won’t be seen and for making plugs for fill-n-drill. Has never been an issue.

    Comments that it will not make a smooth paste are absolutely correct. That’s why I use it only in areas where appearance doesn’t matter. Wood flour is far more consistent.

    Jbo
     

  9. DrewHall
    Joined: Jun 2019
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: united kingdoms

    DrewHall Junior Member

    Thank you for your reply to my thread, I much appreciate you taking the time, to giving me your feed back, on the question's I posed. As I will be using this mixture in area's that will not be on viewed, it seems the way to go, to save some money.
     
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