Glue/epoxy advice.

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by ROUGE, Dec 14, 2007.

  1. ROUGE
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    Location: maine

    ROUGE Junior Member

    I was wondering if anyone had any good suggestions for an epoxy that would be strong enough for laminating frames, but could cure at really low temps. I'm in the middle of a Maine winter, here, and my project doesn't have 24hr heating that most epoxy products would require. One person I've talked to suggested GL-10. Any thoughts?
    Thanks!
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    If you are laminating oak, epoxy is a bad choice. Otherwise, any of the major brands wil do.
     
  3. ROUGE
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    Location: maine

    ROUGE Junior Member

    Thanks, I guess I'll be going with the GL 10, then. I see you're from Millwaukee, do you happen to know a three masted schooner called Dennis Sullivan?
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    GL-10 is a epoxy, that is pre mixed with fillers to provide a slightly thickened, creamy goo for joint assembly.

    Resorcinol and one of the modified aliphatic resins are typical choices for laminating most of the oaks.

    Much depends on the wood type, the environment the laminations will live and the need for particular adhesive qualities.

    What are you laminating? Where will it live? Can you provide sufficient clamping pressure? Temperature range during cure process? Etc., etc., etc. . .
     
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  5. ROUGE
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    Location: maine

    ROUGE Junior Member

    Well, I'm actually spliceing a 2x2 steam bent oak frame- cutting off the bad portion and replacing it with new wood. The replacement piece is right at the turn of the bilge and will have to be well steamed and clamped as it is. The epoxy (or, it sounds like resorcinol is better) is just for where the two join together. I'm doing the work in Maine outdoors but under a plastic shelter, so I was thinking that I could only use a low temp curing epoxy.

    However, a friend of mine suggested putting some sort of little box around the joint and leaving a high powered light on inside to keep it in the cure temp range for any glue or epoxy.

    And the last answer: the frame is for my boat, so it'll be living in Salt water.
    Thanks for your help.
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yep, you'll need to control environmental conditions for both adhesives, though epoxy is likely to fail in that application. Insure the mating surfaces are very well matched as resorcinol doesn't have gap filling properties.
     
  7. EStaggs
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Spokane, Wa

    EStaggs Senior Member

    One solution I use here in Spokane, Wa (just a little south of BC) is IR heat.

    The infrared heaters heat the surface and material im working on, without heating the air outside the work area. In a situation like that, a little tarping (in a fire-conscious way) and an IR heater will give you good results regardless of the glue. Try not to overheat any of the parts.

    E
     
  8. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Rouge: I am very familiar with the Dennis Sullivan. I was one of the instructors at the small boat shop attached to the project.
     
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  9. ROUGE
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    Location: maine

    ROUGE Junior Member

    Well that's pretty sweet. I was the chief mate between florida and Milwaukee after the rescue that cost them a plank. Are you still involved with the organization?
     
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