General costs of lamination

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by Biscayne Boats, Sep 21, 2010.

  1. Biscayne Boats
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Biscayne Boats Junior Member

    I am currently finalizing a business plan and need to confirm some general material costs. I have plans for a 18 flats boat and need some costs figures vinylester resin and glass to include in the unit cost. It there a basic formula for material per square foot?
     
  2. Eric Sponberg
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    Eric Sponberg Senior Member

    Contact your local fiberglass wholesale materials supplier for the unit costs of the resin and glass. Ask your nearest boat builders who they buy their materials from. These prices will be given in dollars per pound. You can expect a rough mix of 40% glass and 60% resin, by weight, as a starting point if you do a good laminating job. If you get really good, the ratio of glass-to-resin will go higher. If you use a resin infusion process, you can get as high as 70% glass content by weight, which is about the maximum achievable limit. Above that limit and you will likely be getting dry fiber. The 40/60 mix is about typical for a good quality hand layup. How much material you use for your design is going to depend on the engineering and laminate schedule. It is easy to make boats heavy by putting too much material into them. Also, some designs are easier to build than others and that affects the labor hours, which is the biggest cost component in small boat building. For example, if your design has a number of style lines in the hull and/or deck shape, or even lifting strakes in the hull bottom, these are going to be harder to build and take more labor hours than if you use simpler shapes and details in your design.

    I hope that helps you continue with your business plan.

    Eric
     
  3. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    As rough estimate, I would take 10...14 USD per 1 kg of cheapest FRP; and about 20+ USD for sandwich. This includes materials, labor and overheads.

    Costs in other countries could be different... :D
     
  4. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    For a rough estimate of weight, figure 1lb per square foot, per 1/8th inch of laminate.

    Hand lamination will typically have higher resin to glass ratios depending on how much CSM is used in the laminate schedule. CSM laminates may be in the 35% glass range, woven and/or stitched products will be closer to 50% glass

    Just look at your cost on materials, use those numbers and you'll be close. The price of products can vary a great deal on the volume you purchase and the exact type though.
     
  5. Herman
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    Herman Senior Member

    Over here 6 euro per kg, including gelcoat, is the absolute minimum. (processed laminate). The people that sell their products at that price, go bankrupt all the time. So I guess if you would like to make some money, increase that price somewhat... Same if you go for quality.
     
  6. GG
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    GG offshore artie


  7. Herman
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    Location: The Netherlands

    Herman Senior Member

    You need to help me... Which free DVD?
     
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