Gardner's Clamming Skiff

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by Quick Karl, Dec 28, 2014.

  1. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Agreed David, there's no need to do much more than just build a boat like this. It doesn't need but a couple of molds, the transom and stem to define it's shape, making it fair a sweet as you go. If I went to the trouble of a computer model, I'd make her a taped seam build, maybe with some faux frames, to provide the "look". A light spruce, glued to the hull sides will make fine looking frames, to trap dirt and stub your toes on, walking around inside.
     
  2. Quick Karl
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    Quick Karl Junior Member

    I'm going to computer model it, just because I want to - it has nothing whatsoever to do with build, or build method, at least not to me. For me its pretty simple, I've just always liked the boat.

    I asked PAR earlier about a floor and he mentioned lift-out slats - that'll work for me, to keep me from tripping over the frames..!

    Gardner also showed revisions for an outboard-only scheme, but added a wedge. However, if you read the entire article a builder was able to achieve satisfaction just by addition of the center console, moving his weight forward (and this is with the original rockered offsets). Therefore, I am going to use the revised offsets, and omit the wedge, and see what happens.

    I just like the boat guys, it happens.
     
  3. gdavis
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    gdavis Junior Member

    qkarl,its starting to sound like its time to buy some wood and start building. Its a good simple, proven and practical design. Really no need to change anything. Build it and enjoy it.......................................have fun........g
     
  4. Quick Karl
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    Quick Karl Junior Member

    It will be a while - I just got the book (again)! :D

    I've started my computer model and there may, in fact, be a typo or error in the offsets for station 2 Chine (it seems I now recall this from the late 80's when I built a static model of it). Funny I was curious about how to develop shapes mathematically/geometrically, earlier in the thread...

    Anyways.

    I like the boat - it looks like a workboat and probably reminds me of the boats I saw in the boat yards along the coast of NJ when I was a kid. My step father grew up on NY harbor and spent a LOT of time on work boats of all kinds -- he always recommended a dory, period. But I wont be boating in the ocean...

    For me this will be the perfect workboat looking personal fishing boat for the flats in the bays I plan to fish.

    I'm not a naval architect but, I always had a notion to install a full plywood floor over the frames, and fill the voids between the frames with floatation foam. Not for any real reason other than I always wanted an uncluttered floor in it, and might as well fill the voids while I am at it!

    I'm not sure if it is a viable or doable idea...
     
  5. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Don't fill the voids between the frame bays with foam, you'll just create a boat that will rot quickly and this is the worst location for floatation in a boat. You want the floatation high up, under decks and along the hull sides, not below the sole. I would also recommend using slates or a grating, instead of plywood for this sole, so things can drain below, then aft to a transom plug. Simply put, water will get into the boat underway, it's the nature of the beast, so provide a place for it to accumulate and can be pumped or drained off, when you're done for the day.

    As far as her looks as a "work boat", this shape isn't typical for a common working skiff. The bow rake is extreme and the entry a little too fine for this look to be really accurate, but it doesn't really matter, as you like the look. She's more a pleasure boat version of a skiff to me. I think she's a bit dainty forward and initial reports of trim problems with the first builders suggest this is the case. This will be more so with a modern 4 stroke hanging on her butt. To me the shape is better suited for blasting along at high speed (relatively) then actually working the flats, poling around in the saw grass and especially casting from the forward section of the boat. This is where the more typical shapes come to play. They're fuller forward to offer enough volume to make a stable platform for a casting deck or generally "working" from that end of the boat.

    [​IMG]

    This would be a typical bow profile and sheer of a working skiff. The more vertical bow permits more volume forward to support someone working fenders, lines, fishing, pulling a trap, etc. There's enough rocker forward to get the bow "free" in plane mode, yet enough immersion so she'll offer "bearing" if you're forward in the boat. As far as sheer shapes, well this is pretty subjective. I like Digger's, but it's nothing special, simply a blatant knockoff of working skiffs, where the forward sweep and flare helps keep the boat dry, without hindering forward vision underway.

    I say screw the Acad model and just start tossing frames together. You'll find the inconsistencies when you spring the chine battens and a cedar shim or two will fix this a whole lot faster then mousing around on a computer. If you do develop a Cad model, publish the developed panel layouts, as I'm sure this would simply a number looking to build a taped seam version of this boat.
     
  6. Quick Karl
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    Quick Karl Junior Member

    Thanks for the advice, PAR!

    Keep in mind, I am looking for a boat that looks like it might be a fairly easy "first build" - i.e. no strakes, multiple chines, or fancy curves...

    To be honest with you I would like the (Gardner's) boat more if it had a straight stem instead of a curved stem, though I like the angle (although a straight stem might look better angled less?). I'm curious why a boat like this one could not, or does not, have a straight stem? Is the curved stem a result of the developed surface?

    I will stick with the spaced planks for a floor.

    I am working in SolidWorks on this, not AutoCAD (though I do both).
     
  7. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You could stand up the stem on the Gardner, but you'll need to change the chine. It will add volume forward, so you'll also need to pay attention to bottom rocker in the forward sections. This assumes the length remains the same. If you stood up the stem, by rocking the top aft, you can leave the chine as it is and accept a shorter boat, with a more upright stem. The topside planks would need to be adjusted to get a sweet sheer, but not a big problem and the flare will force more torture in the planks, with the foreshortened stem.
     
  8. gdavis
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    gdavis Junior Member

    qkarl, you can have a straight stem with about the same angle and it will carry the flare forward which will give you a drier ride. Check out the Carolina dory skiffs and the pacific dory skiffs. They look pretty good. I've seen a lot of skiffs with flotation foam under the seats, kind of out of sight. Also, being a wooden boat and all helps with the flotation as well. Take a look at the videos on line about the pacific dories being launched off the beach and landing on the beach, what a hoot!....fair thee well..g
     
  9. Quick Karl
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    Quick Karl Junior Member

    Thanks again G!

    I'm not changing any design though - I don't want to screw up a pile of lumber! :D

    Most of my questions are simple curiosities.
     
  10. Quick Karl
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    Quick Karl Junior Member

  11. gdavis
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    gdavis Junior Member

    qk, oh yes, I saw one of those at the maine boat builders show in Portland last year. shoestring is there every year with nice no frills, simple, safe, easy to build and affordable designs. A lot of their boats are built with lumber and ply from your local lumberyard. This is similar to a lumberyard skiff which is a nice rugged and simple work skiff also. I like the p.p. because there is no framing running across the bottom on the inside, makes it real easy to clean after fishing or clamming or whatever. I've built several skiffs using fir a.c. ply and fir underlayment ply, spruce framing and pl premium glue.One was a 23' with a 34" beam on the bottom, sort of like an Asian long boat. It had a long tail outboard I made with a 16 hp v twin briggs engine. I used it often and never babied it, running onto the beach,blasting thru water grass,skimming offer mud flats and even running up onto ice flows. It took all that abuse and more. The ply never delaminated, the pl premium held, and the framing never rotted. So you can use common materials and have an affordable and rugged skiff. A good way for folks to get out on the water. There's nothing like helping someone build a boat!........hope it brings lots of joy.....................adios amigo.......g
     
  12. Quick Karl
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    Quick Karl Junior Member

    I sure wish you lived down here in TX, g - I think we would have a lot of fun building a boat together. You understand what I am looking for in a boat!

    Now, how in the heck does someone make a plywood boat with no bottom frames?

    I might have to spring for a set of PP plans.
     

  13. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    My skiff hasn't any bottom frames either and this isn't an uncommon trait with these types of designs. If the bottom and/or chine logs/taped seam are stiff enough, you don't need athwart futtocks. In fact, for light duty, you don't need them on the sides either, if you employ a small side deck, some well placed knees and a carlin. In my skiff, a casting deck forward reinforces the forward third of the hull sides, the splash well reinforces the aft sections, so just some side decks connecting the ends is all a center console needs. To get this longitudinal stiffness, I use a double 1/2" plywood bottom on the light duty version and a triple layer 1/2" bottom on the heavy duty version. With the 1.5" thick bottom on the HD version, bashing through chop seems like walking down a street, with no sensation of the molecule crushing taking place below your toes. This is how a good working skiff should be.
     
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