Full Rigged Catamaran

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Mithris, Jan 19, 2016.

  1. Mithris
    Joined: Jan 2016
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Langey, WA

    Mithris Junior Member

    Hey guys,

    I'm an author and am doing a little research. I was wondering how a fully rigged, steel, Catamaran would work. Its purpose would be to make voyages from Spain to India via the Horn of Africa. It would need to be able to carry cargo or troops. It would have two or three decks.

    Have any of you ever heard of a fully rigged cat? I've never even heard of one that's square rigged, let alone fully rigged. It would be 100x50 feet. Three masts along the centerline, aft mast has a barque main sail and then square topsails, topgallant, and royals. Topsails and topgallants are split, fore and main mast have skysails.

    Thanks to anyone who responds.
     
  2. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
    Posts: 3,053
    Likes: 150, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 579
    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    What do you mean by fully rigged boat?
    Any boat that works is "fully" rigged by definition.

    Sounds like something you should put a motor on.
    Cats need to be light to have any benefits over monohulls, and Cats have less load carrying ability for a given size.

    The description you give will have almost no ability to go into the wind, a lot like the old square rigged boats. That was what often killed them, they got caught offshore when the wind changed and they could not sail away.
     
  3. Mithris
    Joined: Jan 2016
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Langey, WA

    Mithris Junior Member

    Fully rigged: Three square rigged masts with at least topgallant. The story, its about a group of Americans that are sent back in time to 2500 BC. Three hundred fifty years later they are building a navy. They don't remember how to build internal combustion engines, their electricity is provided by steam power, but they can not bring any of that technology outside of their borders. So if they want to go to the Persian Gulf via ship they have to sail.
     
  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 14,503
    Likes: 659, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    What do they burn for steam? If they have a steam engine, it would make sense to have steam powered propulsion. A ship, in the old sense, had a lot more carrying capacity than a catamaran. Since you are loading it heavily with troops, etc. it would be more efficient to use a monohull. The designs have been perfected and reached their apex by the late 1800's. You could use one of those types, their lines and rigging details are relatively easy to find.
     
  5. Mithris
    Joined: Jan 2016
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Langey, WA

    Mithris Junior Member

    Thanks gonzo,

    They burn oil for steam. They cant bring the steam technology out of their borders.

    I appreciate the response, it makes sense. I was originally planning a large frigate. 160' at the waterline by 45' at the beam. I think that's what the Atlanteans will go with. My dad mentioned the Catamaran and it was interesting enough to ask a few questions.

    If anyone has anything to say I'll keep my eye on this post.
     
  6. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 14,503
    Likes: 659, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

  7. Mithris
    Joined: Jan 2016
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Langey, WA

    Mithris Junior Member

    Thanks Gonzo,

    I'll look them over. When you look at a modern battleship, with the sharp prow. Do you think that a sailing ship with a similar hull would handle well?
     
  8. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
    Posts: 3,075
    Likes: 246, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1279
    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    The Minoans of some 1500 BCE were remarkably advanced in sea faring expertise. They used mono hulls to do their extensive trading with other societies., Later the Hanseatic League merchant sailors used mono hulls. Before that the Vikings sailed far and wide in mono hulled vessels. They all carried cargo of one sort or another. Monos worked best for them and they also work best now for carrying significant cargo. There are no tankers, bulkers, or Roros that use multihulls. There are reasons for that.

    For a fast light, emphasize the word light, multis are in some cases superior. A big, steel hulled, catamaran, troop carrier, or other burdensome vessel is not the appropriate plan form. The realities of established physics and hydrodynamics gets in the way.
     
  9. cmckesson
    Joined: Jun 2008
    Posts: 161
    Likes: 7, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 55
    Location: Vancouver BC

    cmckesson Naval Architect

    Mithris, last year our students at UBC did a design exploration of a square rigged cat, (as a sail training ship for people with disabilities.)

    Please send me a PM with your email, and I'll see if I can find their design report to forward to you.

    Chris McKesson
    Univ. of British Columbia
     
  10. Rurudyne
    Joined: Mar 2014
    Posts: 1,163
    Likes: 36, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 155
    Location: North Texas

    Rurudyne Senior Member

    I don't know about the rigging, but I seem to recall a somewhat dramatic B&W picture of an experiment that mated two navy ships into a giant sailing catamaran from decades ago.

    It was before Photoshop when I saw the picture, so it was probably real, but when I recently searched for the thing (unrelated to your thread) I couldn't find it.

    Anyhoo, if you can find an image of the thing it may help you get an idea about the bridge deck structure needed.
     
  11. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 16,653
    Likes: 323, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 1362
    Location: Cocoa, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Attached Files:

  12. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 16,653
    Likes: 323, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 1362
    Location: Cocoa, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

  13. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
    Posts: 2,338
    Likes: 115, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 871
    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

    The reference of termed "rigged" is pretty funny(to me) I actually work on a couple, but according to the vernacular of youth it could mean anything from pretty messed up to a catamaran adorned with fit young people.... depending on enunciation....

    Jeff.
     
  14. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 14,503
    Likes: 659, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    The traditional definition of a "full rigged ship", is a vessel of three or more masts, all of them with square sails.
     

  15. Mithris
    Joined: Jan 2016
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Langey, WA

    Mithris Junior Member

    Thanks guys for your replies, some of you gave me some good ideas. I think gonzo is right, a cat probably wouldn't make a good deep see cargo ship. Thanks Doug for the dynarig pic. I wonder how a large frigate would handle under a dynarig. I wonder if the masts could handle the load without stays.
     
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. Annode
    Replies:
    11
    Views:
    2,445
  2. mustafaumu sarac
    Replies:
    21
    Views:
    1,951
  3. richp10
    Replies:
    27
    Views:
    2,768
  4. JosephT
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    691
  5. Squidly-Diddly
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    1,313
  6. Squidly-Diddly
    Replies:
    18
    Views:
    3,914
  7. FullyElectricAM
    Replies:
    123
    Views:
    12,165
  8. Samdaman
    Replies:
    27
    Views:
    2,464
  9. Vinassman
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    1,445
  10. southerntidefan
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    1,228
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.