Fuel Tank and Battery Under Console

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Boone, May 5, 2005.

  1. Boone
    Joined: Apr 2005
    Posts: 2
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Wilmington, NC

    Boone New Member

    Would it be a possible explosion problem to place the battery and fuel tank under a console?
     
  2. Alik
    Joined: Jul 2003
    Posts: 2,765
    Likes: 159, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 1306
    Location: Thailand

    Alik Senior Member

    According to ISO10133, You can not place battery next to fuel tank
     
  3. gerard baladi
    Joined: Nov 2004
    Posts: 58
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Egypt

    gerard baladi Junior Member

    Nor even a bilge pump. if my memory serves me right, it should be located not less than 60cm.
     
  4. Palmer
    Joined: Nov 2002
    Posts: 53
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Tacoma, Wa

    Palmer Junior Member

    If you have an outboard you can do anything you want. If not you have to follow Coast Guard Title 33 CFR, Sections 183.401–183.460. Which says that a battery may not be installed directly above or below a gas tank, fitting, or any fuel system component other than an uninterupted length of fuel line. They may be in the same compartment.
     
  5. cyclops
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 1,059
    Likes: 5, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 38
    Location: usa

    cyclops Senior Member

    Since we do not know anything about the boat, or the shape and any openings in the console we are making bad guesses. Specific details would really help. A photo would get us to all agree.
     
  6. Boone
    Joined: Apr 2005
    Posts: 2
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Wilmington, NC

    Boone New Member

    Here are some photos of the boat, console, tank and battery.
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Thunderhead19
    Joined: Sep 2003
    Posts: 506
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 21
    Location: British Columbia, Canada

    Thunderhead19 Senior Member

    Why can't you panel off thefuel tank enclosure so that no vapour can pass into the battery compartment? I assume that you refill your portable tank on the dock, and not inside the boat?
     

  8. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
    Posts: 4,127
    Likes: 146, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 2043
    Location: Ontario

    marshmat Senior Member

    There is an explosion hazard with the setup depicted. Gasoline vapours are heavier than air and in your console would drift right into the battery box with the currnet setup.

    A portable fuel tank should be at least partly exposed to the air, it should never be fully enclosed. And portable tanks are ALWAYS removed from the boat for filling.

    In the boat pictured above, I would place the battery under the black hatch in the front of the console. I would put an airtight panel immediately behind this (not strictly necessary though) and add two vents in the topmost corners of the battery compartment to allow hydrogen to escape. The fuel tank would go in the open space behind, where it can be tethered in place with shock cords and can be removed for fuelling. The portable tank should not be in an enclosed compartment but the battery box can.

    I will quote from Canadian standards here (I believe American ones are basically identical as they were harmonized last decade). Fuel tank bay must have 1 square foot of area exposed to the atmosphere for every 10 cubic feet of volume, or else you must install a venting system (TP1332 6.6). Batteries must be in a dry location above bilge water level (8.9), shall not be directly above a fuel tank or fuel system component (8.13), and must offer a means for hydrogen to escape (8.16). The setup I described above would probably be the easiest way of meeting this.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.