fuel pump screw hole

Discussion in 'Diesel Engines' started by urisvan, May 10, 2014.

  1. urisvan
    Joined: Nov 2005
    Posts: 220
    Likes: 5, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 53
    Location: istanbul

    urisvan Senior Member

    The screw hole in the fuel feed pump is stripped. The mechanic says that it is difficult to repair the screw hole so we need to change the pump! But there is no problem with the pump.
    is it possible to repair the hole with epoxy? First take the pump out, clean it from diesel, then fill the hole with epoxy mixed with microfiber and put some grease on the screw and screw it while eopxy is still wet.
    Do i have to change the pump just because of a stripped screw hole?
    I attached photos. you see the translucent hose connecting with the screw and screw is going into the screw hole of the fuel feed pump. And the epoxy that i could find here is named "supertite"

    Regards
    Ulas
     

    Attached Files:

  2. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 3,818
    Likes: 156, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 971
    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    It looks to me the part the hose is clamped on is a swivel type fitting. A bolt holds it to the fuel pump. If the bolt is loosened, the fitting can be swiveled to whatever angle works best for the fuel hose, depending on where the fuel hose is coming from. Some thing like these...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    If the hose barb tube that goes into the round swivel collar is threaded (and stripped) that could be replaced or welded. If the bolt hole for the bolt that holds the swivel collar to the pump is stripped, that would be different.

    Since you know where the fuel hose is coming from and don't need the universal swivel feature, can you replace it with a 90 degree fitting by maybe re-threading the hole or permanently welding/epoxying it in place?

    [​IMG]




    .
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    It depends on what's stripped, the threads in the block or the banjo fitting threads (what Sam shows above). If the banjo fitting's threads are stripped, you'll need a new pump. If the threads in the block are stripped, you can attempt to restore the threads or use a "Helicoil" insert and repair the threads.

    Can you provide a picture of the actual stripped threads and what they are on (block or pump)?
     
  4. urisvan
    Joined: Nov 2005
    Posts: 220
    Likes: 5, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 53
    Location: istanbul

    urisvan Senior Member

    hello,

    Par, the thread on the pump in stripped. the threads that fits the pump to the engine block are ok, if these are the holes that you are talking about. i tried to point it in the picture.

    So it is a bad news ha? why it is not possible to fill the screw hole in the pump with epoxy putty and make new threads in this epoxy? I hope i could explain.

    Best Regards
    Ulas
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Adler
    Joined: Jan 2010
    Posts: 161
    Likes: 14, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 139
    Location: PIRAEUS - GREECE

    Adler Senior Member

  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 473, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yep, install a HeliCoil and stop talking to the mechanic, that told you to replace the pump, though he might end up being right. The reason is the quality of the metal used on the pump, may not permit a good drill and tapping for the HeliCoil, but it's cheaper to try this first, before buying a new pump.
     

  7. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    it looks like you are talking about the lift pump, they are fairly inexpensive, replace it and save yourself a lot of headache.
     
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