Fuel Pump/Merc 302 Ford

Discussion in 'DIY Marinizing' started by sledrider_ny, May 2, 2003.

  1. sledrider_ny
    Joined: May 2003
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    sledrider_ny New Member

    I was wondering if theres any reason why I can't put a regular auto fuel pump on a boat with a Mercruiser 302 Ford engine. The only thing I can see different is that theres a sediment bowl attached to the pump. Is this bowl absolutely neccesary or can I discontinue it. It will still run through the water seperator before the pump. The reason I ask this is because a regular Ford ford fuel pump is $20 and Mercury wants $98 for one. Put a starter solenoid in it today that I bought from NAPA for $7 and afterwards I looked up one from Mercury and it was $38 for the same thing. Crooks I tell yuh!!!
     
  2. Ward
    Joined: May 2003
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    Location: Texas

    Ward Junior Member

    Im not all that familiar with marine engines, but I am very familiar with auto engines, especially small-block ford and chevy. One strange thing I've learned while my friend and I were restoring his 2 65 mustangs and 66, its that an autozone replacement fuel pump for a 65 mustang has a sediment bowl, while one for a 66 doesnt. These are both for a 289, which is the same block as a 302. So if you're needing the sediment bowl, get a fuel pump for a 65 mustang w/289 :)
     
  3. Jeff
    Joined: Jun 2001
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    Location: Great Lakes

    Jeff Moderator

    Be very careful - I don't have any specific knowledge about your fuel pump (I'm not a mechanic), but the concern I would have would involve what happens if or when the fuel pump might fail. If the pump fails, will an automotive pump flood your bilge with explosive gasoline and vapor through a vent hole or similar? Likewise, automotive alternators, distributors, and starters can ignite any gasoline vapor in your bilge, while the marineized versions are "ignition protected" with the contacts sealed so they won't spark and ignite fuel vapor.
     
  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    It is VERY DANGEROUS to put automotive fuel or electrical systems in boats. The marine fuel pump, which is still available, has a reservoir for fuel if the primary diafragm fails. Marine pumps have double diafragms, automotive pumps have one and spill fuel through a hole if it fails. The starter solenoid you put is vented and not sealed like a marine type. They are not crooks, but sell specialized equipment that is more expensive to manufacture. Also, your installation is illegal. You are in violation of Federal and State laws. It will also void any warranties an boat insurance you may have. In case of fire or explosion, you would also be liable. I have investigated many marine accidents and seen lots of boats burned or exploded because of automotive equipment installed in them. I encourage you very strongly to correct the installation with proper equipment.
     
  5. tom kane
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    Location: Hamilton.New Zealand.

    tom kane Senior Member

  6. TheFisher
    Joined: Oct 2003
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    Location: Middleburg, FL

    TheFisher Junior Member

  7. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    The stripper or overflow tube routes gas to the carburator where it is burned instead of spilled into the bilges.
     

  8. tom kane
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Hamilton.New Zealand.

    tom kane Senior Member

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