Fuel coming out side of carburetor?

Discussion in 'Gas Engines' started by Catfish Howard, Nov 6, 2021.

  1. Catfish Howard
    Joined: Nov 2021
    Posts: 29
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    Location: Panama City FL

    Catfish Howard Junior Member

    I've been having trouble getting my gas line bubble hard and noticed fuel spilling out the side of one of the carbs? One week later I decided to update my gas tank and fuel line and when I put the new fuel line on the bubble actually got hard but I wanted to see if fuel would come out and eventually it did after additional 8 pumps of the ball after it got hard.

    I figure this is not suppose to happen? What is my next step?

    Motor is a 60 hp Johnson Tracker Pro Series Model # TJ60TLEIB
    fuel.jpg
     
  2. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    Fuel should never leak out if the carb and into the engine compartment. Most engines have drains on carbs and they can leak easily.
     
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  3. SolGato
    Joined: May 2019
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    Location: Kauai

    SolGato Senior Member

    If you have fuel leaking out of the carb from a point above the bowl, especially when you pump prime, you likely have a float or seat issue.

    As fuel fills the bowl, it causes the float to rise and seal off the valve, shutting off fuel flow.

    Debris or residue from ethanol fuels can cause a fuel valve not to seat. Also if it is a hard needle it can be worn from vibration, or in the case of rubber tipped needle, damaged due to modern fuels.

    The float can also either be hanging up by touching the sides of the carb, or sunk and taking in fuel.

    Most carbs have a overfill bowl drain with a line attached that would route the spillage outside the compartment.

    Some also have a vent to allow vapors to escape. Yours appear to be vents, either that or it is coming from somewhere else and dripping on that area.

    Also if you don’t get a firm bulb and don’t have any leaks, you’re inline check valve could be bad, or you could have a problem at the fuel pump.

    Easiest way to inspect a float issue if you have access is to drain the bowl and remove it. Put a container under and let the float drop as you pump fuel or air in, then raise the float and make sure the valve stops the flow of fuel or water when the float is at the proper height. This can all be done without removing the carb leaving it in place and plumbed to better troubleshoot the issue.

    If air/fuel is getting past the needle and seat, remove the float and needle and inspect the needle tip for wear or debris.
     
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  4. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    It does sound like a float or needle valve problem.
     
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  5. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Carbs been sitting awhile? Might need rebuilding,
     
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  6. Catfish Howard
    Joined: Nov 2021
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    Location: Panama City FL

    Catfish Howard Junior Member

    2 years ago it just wouldn't start while at the lake, it's been sitting ever since. I thought it was just a fuel line bubble giving me problems until I seen the fuel start coming out the side. I've been watching videos and mine does look like it's coming out of a screen vent at the top. I'll disassemble them in the next couple days and see if I can troubleshoot it.

    I also checked the spark plugs and I'm not getting any spark from any of the three plugs. I found a power pack for a hundred bucks so I just took a shot in the dark and ordered it, I'll have it in a couple days. I was wanting to check everything with a meter but I have no idea what the wires should be reading. If I found a repair manual would it actually tell me what each wire output should read and how to troubleshoot to find the electrical issue if the power pack doesn't work?

    Funny, I was just telling my nephews the other day they don't know how lucky they are since the internet came out. I guess I fall in that same category now since I can't find anything on this exact motor usually I can find anything on YouTube . Guess I might have to go old school.
     
  7. Catfish Howard
    Joined: Nov 2021
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    Location: Panama City FL

    Catfish Howard Junior Member

    I would say they're the vents, I'll be taking them apart in the next couple days and checking that out thanks for the info.
     
  8. Barry
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Barry Senior Member

    Motor is a 60 hp Johnson Tracker Pro Series Model # TJ60TLEIB problems with fuel leak in carbs

    google this for a lot of information
    Google You Tube Carb rebuild 60 hp Johnson Tracker Pro Series Model # TJ60TLEIB as there is probably someone somewhere who has done this.
     
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  9. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    You are gonna want to take apart and soak overnite in carb cleaner and kit it. Too long not running...simple as that, but do it right!
     
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  10. Catfish Howard
    Joined: Nov 2021
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    Location: Panama City FL

    Catfish Howard Junior Member

  11. Catfish Howard
    Joined: Nov 2021
    Posts: 29
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    Location: Panama City FL

    Catfish Howard Junior Member

    Well!!!! I guess I'm the poster child for neglecting my 3 carburetors. I have to look up how much I paid the marina 2 years ago to get my motor running good, they just said I had water in the gas, I only ran the motor for 1 hour after getting it back. The top carb looked okay, the middle was 100% blocked and the lower has stick grease like oil in it. The copper pin started corroding in the middle one and the float valve seat was stuck with corrosion. The in-line filter was pretty dirty, there again would have been nice if the marina would have see this, it needed replacing no question.

    What more might I need to do now that the carbs have so much dirt and corrosion?
    Should I replace all the fuel lines in case the ethanol has eaten them? Maybe the grime is the hosing falling apart?

    I guess I need to get the replacement kit for the primer solenoid?

    How do I clean these? Is there a chemical soak or do I need to buy a ultrasonic cleaner? I found one at harbor freight $70, which chemical would be good to use in the ultrasonic?

    I guess I should get a water separator?

    I guess I better start buy ethanol free (you think).

    IMG_20211107_142732794.jpg IMG_20211107_135607204.jpg 16.jpg 16a.jpg
     
  12. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Start off with cleaning the carbs.

    get a gallon of carb cleaner with the washpan in the can at auto parts store

    follow instructions well; avoid bathing parts the carb cleaner will eat and destroy!

    as for your fuel lines, no boat should be burdened with ethanol ever, I would open everything and let it dry up to get water and condensation out

    yes to a f/w separator-inline filter

    then put some premium non-ox fuel in the tanks and pump it thru the filters to a bucket with a primer bulb-no smokin eh!

    after you run say a gallon thru, change the filters and you should be safe running to the kitted and clean carbs

    ps-if you miss anything on the carbs like the main jets ir dirt screens; you'll not run well
     
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  13. SolGato
    Joined: May 2019
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    Location: Kauai

    SolGato Senior Member

    If you have other small carbureted engines, an ultra sonic cleaner is worth the investment.

    But a turkey pan, toothbrush, compressed air, some gasoline and carb cleaner will also do.

    Ethanol not only leaves a sticky residue behind, but it also turns rubber to goo. So gas lines, fuel pump diaphragms, needle seats, Orings, etc.. are all susceptible to damage.

    If you can source non-ethanol fuel use it.

    If not, run your bowls dry after running the motor by disconnecting fuel line and letting it idle until it stops if you know it’s going to sit for a week or so, and use products like Seafoam in your gas to help keep the fuel system clean.

    Ethanol fuel starts to break down very quickly, so use a product like Stabil for longer term storage, or better yet just use fresh gas.

    I would replace all the fuel line as it’s cheap insurance. Sellers on Ebay sell the odd ball smaller metric size stuff in bulk for vintage motorcycles and outboards. There are better grades of fuel line available that will stand up better to Ethanol. For example in the automotive industry, typically a line rated for high pressure fuel injection is of better quality. Use factory clips and replace them if they don’t fit tightly. Do not use perforated banded hose clamps.

    If you can replace rubber Orings and seals with Viton, do so.

    Definitely add a water separator.

    After you get the carbs cleaned, use spray and compressed air to clear all ports. Be sure to remove the idle mixture screw, all jets, etc..

    Use a brush to remove any green (brass) or white (aluminum) corrosion and chalking due to water.

    If your mixture screws are hidden behind caps, now would be the time to remove the caps to expose the screws so you can clean the passages and have the ability to properly tune you carbs.

    If you buy kits for the carbs, spend the extra money and buy quality kits. Changing out all the parts just because you have new ones in a kit is not always the way to go if the kits are cheap.

    Make sure you get your floats set right upon reassembly and that you feed the refreshed carbs with clean fuel.

    Once you get it started make sure you get the carbs well synced and that they respond as they should to idle and mixture adjustments.

    A fresh set of properly gapped plugs would help with tuning.

    When running ethanol fuels, it’s also very important to have a strong ignition system that is working properly.

    After that it’s pretty much maintenance and making sure you leave as little ethanol fuel in the system as possible when not in use, and that you keep water out of your fuel supply.
     
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  14. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    makes you wonder what ethanol (alcohol) does to the internals of the body, when you see what it does to fuel line components !
     

  15. Catfish Howard
    Joined: Nov 2021
    Posts: 29
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    Location: Panama City FL

    Catfish Howard Junior Member

    Thanks for the reply. would it be a good idea to change out the VRO2 (fuel/oil pump) with a new fuel pump? The previous owner disconnected the oil pump so I just need to buy 438559 Karbay Fuel Pump, I believe the pump would have external pulse but I haven't look yet to see if the motor has a place for mounting.

    Any advise what to check since none of the 3 spark plugs have spark? I bought a power pack for $100 since I have no idea about electric figured it would be a good chance that's it?
     
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