French Corail

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by tansails, Jan 15, 2006.

  1. tansails
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    tansails Junior Member

    Hello

    Can anyone tell me about a French yacht manufacturer from the 80's called Corail .
    In particular I am intersted in a Chined steel Corail Galapagos 50 but the broker knows little about the boat and has no knowledge of underwater profile or hull data, the owners are not forthcoming either.

    Any information about the firm the boat and any experience with this design at sea would be most welcome.

    With thanks
    Michael Bailey
     
  2. Guillermo
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    Location: Pontevedra, Spain

    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

  3. tansails
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    tansails Junior Member

    Guillermo
    Thanks for the response I had found that website and have corresponded with the broker already.

    Actually there is one in your country that is a lot better value.

    The one in Texas has been stripped of a few things, no anchor winch, no autohelm, No self steering, no tender (dinghy). Lots to install before you could cruise extensively.

    They have no idea of the specs either. I hoped someone would have met the design or sailed on them and maybe a bit of urban mythology as to their ability comfort etc. What happened to Corail ? was their work of a good standard.


    Thanks
    Michael
     
  4. D'ARTOIS
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    D'ARTOIS Senior Member

    I don't know what happened to Corail, but generally the French are not good in steelbuilding - it is not their material.

    An other particular fact is their liking for chine/multichined hulls when building in metal.

    Fact is that single chine sailboat hulls often show remarkable seaworthyness.
     
  5. MikeJohns
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    MikeJohns Senior Member

    Tansails

    I have met these boats before both in the Caribbean and in the Pacific, there must be a few about. Seem to be good performers, can't help you with the scantlings or design data , my searches showed nothing either. If you are worried as to the design standard you could measeure the frame and stringer sizes and dimensions and post them here, one of us can then tell you what the skin thickness should be.
    Underwater profile of the Galapagos is a moderate swept back fin and a skeg supported rudder. Displ is around 23 tonnes. Hope this helps

    Dartois
    you will be converted to the advantages and beuaties of chined hulls yet !

    All the best
    Mike
     
  6. D'ARTOIS
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    D'ARTOIS Senior Member

    Hey Mike, due to computercrash lost your mailaddress;

    Look, I prefer round bilge, but regarding seaworthiness a single chine can be as good as a round bilge.

    There was a yard in Holland that built cheap (?) single chined hulled yachts that even went to above the 83 deg circle. (Nova Zembla and the like) - Not a dent in the hull.
     

  7. MikeJohns
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    MikeJohns Senior Member

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