Frankenstein Skiff

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Iowa Skiff, Apr 27, 2014.

  1. Iowa Skiff
    Joined: Apr 2014
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    Location: Iowa

    Iowa Skiff New Member

    Hey Those Smarter than I,

    I have an idea to run by those of you who are experienced in boat building as I have none. I have recently purchased a 1974 Sea Star shell. The entire boat has been gutted including the top. The picture below is an example. My plan is to build a Carolina skiff style fishing boat. Now that I have a hull I am planning to glass ribs about every 18" from transom to just about the stern. Epoxy the entire inside with fiberglass patched areas (between ribs and transom) for added strength. Add a floor, center console, fishing deck on front and platform on the back. I do intend on adding inwales and gunwales to the ribs. Anyone with tips it would be greatly appreciated. I know there is something I am missing and my knowledge is minute. Thanks

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  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    Don't over think or over build the structure. You don't need all those ribs, they'll just add weight, cost and effort to the project. Just put in a perimeter cleat, maybe a few athwart under sole partitions and 'glass it down.

    The worst thing you can do is add too much weight and need a 200 HP outboard to go 10 MPH.
     
  3. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    Iowa, you have a good start on your rebuild. It sounds like you might be a better craftsman than you have said. Par is right in that you need not overbuild. Weight is the enemy both in the water and out.

    One suggestion: Explore the transom critically. Drill some holes, determine whether it is water logged or has some rot. If it needs help, now is the time, not after all that other work.

    Best of luck with the project.
     
  4. Iowa Skiff
    Joined: Apr 2014
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    Location: Iowa

    Iowa Skiff New Member

    Hey Thanks,

    I will indeed check out the transom in detail and any necessary repair. My nautical terminology is lousy so pardon my questions. I'm not 100% sure what "perimeter cleat" and "athwart under sole partitions" are? The cleat I assume provides support like the inwale and gunwale or do you mean tie downs? The athwart is similar to the ribs but maybe one near the stern and one near the bow and would also be support for fuel/battery/storage compartment and a bow deck/compartment?
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The term athwart means across the boat (side to side) and can refer to anything, including your girlfriend who might prefer to lie athwart, rather than fore and aft.

    A cleat is what we nail, screw bond or attach stuff to. Typically, on a sole (the thing you walk on when inside the boat), the perimeter of the sole (usually plywood pieces) has a 1x2 or similar bonded to the hull shell and the top edge is beveled, so the plywood sole can lay flush on top of it. The sole material is bonded to it, often using temporary screws to hold it in place until the goo (technical term) cures.

    The partitions I mentioned, are also usually plywood and cut to fit (arranged athwartship) under the sole and are "tabbed" (sort of like heavy duty bonding) to the hull shell. You'd only need a few of these and maybe a few stringers (1x2's) running fore and aft and possibly along the tops of the partitions, so you have more gluing area and extra sole support when all the bonding done. These partitions divide the hull's bilge (the area under the sole) into compartments, which can be foam filled for floatation or used as storage, bait wells, a place for the fuel tank to live, etc.

    You also don't need an "inwale" if the boat is going to have side decks, assuming a stout rub rail is used. A Carolina skiff also doesn't have a gunwale, though I assume what you mean is a rub rail, which on a typical production boat would be an extruded aluminum strip, often with a rubber or plastic insert in the middle to protect your boat, when you bash into stuff, like docks.
     

  6. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member


    Here's the second best tip, make sure that this shell that has been gutted and the top sides removed (for how many years?)has not sagged or been badly supported and lost it's original shape. Rebuilding it will lock in whatever shape is there, good or bad.
     
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