Frames and stringers, or Stitch and glue?

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Filmdaddy, Jun 20, 2011.

  1. Filmdaddy

    Filmdaddy Previous Member

    Assuming a lumberyard boat, a scow, 32-40 feet long, 6-8 foot beam, which method of building would be fastest/cheapest? Finish is work boat, use is summer cottage on rivers and lakes.

    Thanks...
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    That's a very odd design at those length to beam ratios and quite large, particularity if a lumberyard type of build (inferior, weaker materials). Which design do you have in mind? I ask because anyone (qualified) designing such a vessel, wouldn't be asking about construction methods in such broad terms. Can you be more specific about what your project is?
     
  3. lewisboats
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Iowa

    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    The long and the short? For the long...answer PAR (Paul)...for the short, use frames and stringers. Don't expect it to last the ages unless you spend $$$ on coatings. To avoid this...use durable woods, be prepared to spend as much $$$ in wood as you would in coatings. Either way expect to either rebuild/major repair in 5-10 years or spend the big bucks initially and do the same in 20-25 years. Best solution...use steel or even better...Aluminum for the hull and wood for the fittings (Still major $$$). That way you only have to replace the wood part later on if you are diligent in keeping up on the paint for the hull. Cheap and long lasting...unlikely!
     
  4. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    Not stitch and glue.
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I too think taped seam (stitch and glue) would be "stretching the envelop" a bit. I've designed taped seam craft as large as this, but it requires a lot of thought in the laminate schedule, for the seams and other attachments. I think we have another self designed craft here, by someone that doesn't understand the global and localized loading issues they must contend with, even on a barge style houseboat.

    The plywood over frames method is easy to understand and assemble. The draw back of course, is you have to purchase, cut and install a bunch of frames, floors, stringers and possably intermediates too. Tape seam (stitch and glue) can eliminate most if not all of these little "pieces", but you have a much higher "goo factor" and some find working with 'glass and goo less desirable then plank on stick.

    If you are reasonably proficient with goo work, then tapes seam is faster, but if you're a complete novice with 'glass work then plank on frame can be faster as the learning curve for goo work will eat up any time savings.

    In the end, the "fastest" method is dependent on what you know and what you're comfortable with.
     
  6. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    My personal take is after building a few dinghies with both stitch and glue and frame stringer is that I prefer frame stringer I think with stitch and glue you transfer imprecision into parts other than the hull shell in other words you seem to spend more time working on getting other parts to fit like thwarts bulkheads etc not large adjustments but you seem to need to touch everything up a bit for good joints and spend more time with epoxy filling gaps. I can see from an amateur perspective why stitch and glue is more attractive because you get a hull shell up quickly and that probably helps keep amateurs enthusiastic and on the job of building the boat.
     
  7. Filmdaddy

    Filmdaddy Previous Member

    Wow. Thank you all for the quick responses. A little history - a friend is looking for a houseboat, and came up with this idea. I am not completely sure that I have the skill to advise him, so I asked here. Thanks again.
     

  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The best advise you can offer your friend is to buy a set of plans, preferably from a living designer (so you can call and ask questions). Self designing never works out well.
     
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