Folding arm materials - Any reason not to use Aluminum?

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Jetboy, Feb 7, 2012.

  1. Jetboy
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    Jetboy Senior Member

    Thanks. That was kinda my thought too. The only difference I might make is to make the amas demountable rather than permanently fixed to the beams. Basically build reinforced mounting points on top based on the original internal structure or something like it, then have the beams bolt on. That way I can change the amas if I ever need to/want to. I might want to try some foils down the road and it would be easier with bolt up ama connections. Should be pretty easy to re-design, and quick to build. Just need to draw something up. I'm almost ready to start the internal framework so I'd better figure it out soon.
     
  2. Silver Raven
    Joined: Oct 2011
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    Silver Raven Senior Member

    Gooday 'J-B' Why don't you go directly to Ian Farrier & ask him. He's just got to be years in front of most design tech. I'm sure he'd give you 'some' valuable advice. I know he drops into some of these 'forums' for time to time - but why not contact him direct. - sailing anarchy - - crew.org.nz & here also - - that's what I'd be doing - for sure.

    He sure does have some 'FAB' toys & they go FAST - work WELL & don't break much if at all.

    Go into the - www.melvestmarine.com - site - you'll sure learn a lot - just keep looking in there & follow many of the videos - cause it sure is a grand learning curve - for sure. Ciao, james

    PS. I've been in the 'fiberglas' (or fibreglass) industry for a long time & can't believe that - stiffness to weight ratio would not favour a - carbon - insusion - vacume - system by a large % - - if you can get your head around how to do it. Seems to me it would be worth to effort - as in more enjoyment - faster/stiffer boat - for every minute that you are sailing it. jj
     
  3. warwick
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    warwick Senior Member

    I agree with as to the float cross beam connection could do with more work. Then storing the the float cross beam assembly, while you are building the mainhull. Have you had look at the wavelength web site of Bob Forster there might be some ideas there for you as to his cross beam assembly (similar to Ian Farriers cross beams).
     
  4. Silver Raven
    Joined: Oct 2011
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    Silver Raven Senior Member

    Gooday 'Wassa' - who the hell is - Bob Forster ???

    Cross-beams, floats (amas), c/b & rudders - can't be built - stronger - stiffer - lighter than with 'carbon-laminate' - when done properly ! !

    The lighter, stiffer, stronger - the vessel - the more fun it will be to sail for each & every monemt that you are sailing it - we've known that for 50 years or even 150 years (& that's only just before my time) - Ciao, james
     
  5. warwick
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    warwick Senior Member

    Bob Forster worked with Ian Farrier when setting up Ostac Marine in Austrailia, working up to, I think it was production manager. There has been a article in the Australian multihull world magazine by Peter Hackett about Bob Forster and the wave length trimaran.
    More may be found on the small trimarans web site.
     
  6. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Corley epoxy coated

    Heres the link to Bob Forster's website for the Wavelength 780. Nice little folding trimaran with good sailing qualities and a comfortable interior.

    http://wavelengthmultihulls.com/
     
  7. warwick
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    warwick Senior Member

    Thanks Corley for putting Bob Forster's link up.

    I find interesting his construction technique. 3 mm ply strip planked transversely with stringers, in a split mold.

    How ever I think we may be getting off topic unless its Ok with Jetboy.
     

  8. gypsy28
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    gypsy28 Senior Member

    I can personally vouch for Bob Forsters designs. I have sailed (raced and cruised) on the first and second launched boats, absolutely great boats and Bob has a massive amount of knowledge in trailerable trimarans of all kinds.
    The Wavelength 780 is more cruise orientated but is still competitive with the F24 and F82, a Wavelength 780 won this years Bay to Bay on OMR so is still very competitive

    DAVE
     
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