Fitting new cutlass bearing

Discussion in 'Inboards' started by 7228sedan, Apr 21, 2013.

  1. 7228sedan
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    Location: New Jersey USA

    7228sedan Senior Member

    After fitting my new cutlass bearing today, I noticed that it is about 1/8" too long :confused:. The bearing is currently flush on the aft end of the strut & protruding out in front by said 1/8". Should I leave it be or try to cut it down to fit flush?
     
  2. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    I always cut them flush. Dont know if it makes any difference.

    When they overhang, the bit sticking out gets painted and corroded. When time comes to replace the cutlass this paint and corrosion makes pulling the old cutlass difficult.

    Also if you pick up a rope in the prop and the cutlass is exposed to this rope, you could " twist" the cutlass in its housing and once again make it difficult to extract .

    When seating a cutlass I do it twice. First fit the bearing , drill for keepers, mark length, then remove...trim and carefully remove any burr from the keeper holes and slightly round over the leading and trailing edge of the cutlass with a file.

    Again , this is to make future removal easy.

    Nothing worse than a cutlass that is difficult to extract
     
  3. 7228sedan
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    7228sedan Senior Member

    Funny you should mention how they can be "tough" to remove...
    The one that came out had to be in there for 20 years. The prior owner was rather lax in maintenance but yet thought that he knew it all. 4 cuts with the reciprocating saw and a chisel were needed to take it out in pieces. It was worn through to the brass from the misalignment which killed the transmission. But that misalignment resulted in me getting her for nothing!
    I think I'll take the excess off and smooth the edge while I wait for my new shaft.

    Thanks for the response!
     
  4. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Its good to clean the bore of the P bracket before seating the new bearing.

    I use a homemade rig on a cordless drill... length of threaded rod, with an old drill chuck on the end and a PVC pipe cover over the shaft. A wire brush or even better a couple wraps of 3m Scothbright pad on a dowelhttp://[​IMG] is then inserted and the bore is cleaned up.
     
  5. missinginaction
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    missinginaction Senior Member

    You know something Michael, no matter how long I keep coming here I can always learn something new.

    MIA
     
  6. 7228sedan
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    7228sedan Senior Member

    I cleaned up the bore nice prior to installing the new bearing under the assumption that this will need to be replaced again... Granted I didn't have such a nifty tool ;).
     
  7. missinginaction
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    missinginaction Senior Member

    Regarding the original question.......

    I just received a new Duramax cutless bearing for my boat. It's a small one 1 1/4" ID by 1 1/2" OD by 5 inches long. My strut is only 4 1/2 inches long. I'm thinking of trimming the bearing down to fit using a diamond blade tile saw. This wet saw will keep the bearing cool as it's being cut. Is there any problem with this technique?

    MIA
     
  8. 7228sedan
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    7228sedan Senior Member

    I ended up using a very fine tooth count Dewalt blade on my reciprocating saw. Cut it smooth with no problem. There was not enough time in my cut to really heat up the bearing. The only wet tile saws I have experience with are the table types. I can't speak to how yours would work cutting through the brass shell. Good luck!
     
  9. missinginaction
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    missinginaction Senior Member

    Thanks, appreciate the reply. MIA
     
  10. Tigawave
    Joined: Sep 2007
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    Tigawave Junior Member

    If you are pressing it in I'd leave it at 5" and then you have something to grab hold of when you need to change it. It certainly won't do any harm leaving it longer.
     

  11. Tigawave
    Joined: Sep 2007
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    Location: Buckland

    Tigawave Junior Member

    You can fit shaft bearings as a clearance fit bedded on epoxy, some manufacturers recommend this approach. This makes fitting and removal much easier.
     
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