Fishing trawler conversion

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Manny, Aug 23, 2018.

  1. Manny
    Joined: Aug 2018
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    Manny Junior Member

    Would an old Dutch steel fishing trawler make a decent long distance cruiser?
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    In general, old boats or anything else used for working, will be in rather poor condition. What do you mean by long distance, and what area do you plan to cruise?
     
  3. Manny
    Joined: Aug 2018
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    Manny Junior Member

    We are on the West Coast of Scotland, and want to cruise to Greenland, via Iceland and the Faroe Isles

    I understand that generally old working boats are tired, but I'm more concerned with safety and comfort.
     
  4. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    You should check the paper work first. Does it have a stability book..does it have a record of work done on the vessel since delivery to now?
    Then you should get a local naval architect to do a survey and get them to give you a better opinion with regards to the safety and operational side. They could also give advice/report on the structural integrity too.

    Treat like buying an old car. It it doesn't have an MOT and doesn't have any service history...run!
     
  5. Manny
    Joined: Aug 2018
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    Manny Junior Member

    I have rebuilt numerous old cars with no history or mot, but somehow a 60t metal boat is more intimidating. We currently have a beneteau 35 so know from experience what we want from converting a boat.

    One of the boats we have in mind failed its stability test due to the huge drums and fishing gear fitted , but that would all get removed Subject to us buying the boat.
     
  6. GhostriderIII
    Joined: Apr 2014
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    GhostriderIII Junior Member

    That depends on the boat. I've converted a few old trawlers, selling off the rigging to scrappers, having seakeeper installed and cleaning up the vessel. Biggest problem is the fish holds - depending on whether they are for live or freezers. The smell is overwhelming, even for our seafaring family.
     
  7. Manny
    Joined: Aug 2018
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    Manny Junior Member

    so in the last 9 months, we have gone from all out twin rig trawler, to a stripped down boat.
    the entire aft accommodation as been ripped out, and I am in the process of removing the fish hold, and then the fore peak.
    the port side hull is severely corroded and will require replating.
    I have a respected welder booked to come and have a look in a few weeks to determine if it is feasible to save her. 20190522_180515.jpg 20190525_132646.jpg 24846346036_a4f4a86025_b.jpg TT-282 Semper Victoria-L.jpg 20190525_132755.jpg 20190525_132810.jpg 20190526_171534.jpg

    20190522_180515.jpg 20190525_132646.jpg 24846346036_a4f4a86025_b.jpg TT-282 Semper Victoria-L.jpg
     

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  8. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Thanks for the updates.

    Whilst this sounds a good idea, a welder will not be a structurally savvy person in terms of strength and fit-for-purpose. They can tell you visually what is what and don't forget it is in their interest to get work, hence they may provide a positive spin. I would urge you get a naval architect/structural engineer to do the same, along with your welder, to fully assist the structure and its ability to do the job at hand, with or without repairs.
     
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  9. GhostriderIII
    Joined: Apr 2014
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    Location: Iceland

    GhostriderIII Junior Member



    Looks like he bought a rust bucket. Fixing up a Benatau is completely different than working with steel. I know because I worked with steel and aluminum for twenty years. Today I work with wood. A scan of the hull is needed. Also visual inspection of the internals. Chances are the exterior rust is just that. Old trawlers like this had 12-15mm on the keel, 8-10mm on hull sides and 5mm on deck. If it's anything less than that you're gonna have extenive & expensive repairs.
    Is it keel cooled and what will you replace the engine with?
     
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  10. Manny
    Joined: Aug 2018
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    Manny Junior Member

    She has 8mm below the waterline and 4mm above.
    No keel cooling,, but has a dry exhaust.
    She currently has a Gardner 8l3b, and I have no intention of changing.

    I planned on cutting out and replating 1/2 the boat, not plating over.
    Boat will get a full ultrasonic survey carried out in the next few weeks.

    Wood? No thanks, would deal with Rusty steel all day long before considering a wooden boat.
     
  11. GhostriderIII
    Joined: Apr 2014
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    Location: Iceland

    GhostriderIII Junior Member

    You should have done the ultra sound as a pre inspection item. That way you'd know exactly how many plates were thin.
    Yes, I work with wood - most of my gulets are mahogany or coyhaique cypress.
     
  12. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    +1 re a full Ultrasound survey as a priority now before you proceed any further.
    You mention "the port side hull is severely corroded and will require replating."
    Does this include 8 mm plating below the waterline as well?
    The Gardner 8L3B has to be the best part of the boat by far - if you are going to already have to replace a lot of / most of the portside steel work, then you could perhaps consider building a new hull that is more fit / suitable for what you have in mind, and install the Gardner in this instead?
     
  13. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

  14. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    While on the subject of Gardners, here is an excellent Blog about rebuilding a 6LXB - ok, not an 8L3B, but still a wonderful engine.
    And an excellent Blog as well.
    Mr. Geeeeeeeeeeeeee is in the House! https://mobius.world/mr-geeeeeeeeeeeeee-is-in-the-house/

    And for high latitudes exploration, they do seem to be ideal - David Cowper's Polar Bound has an 8LXB.
    Gardner + Aluminium = Goldilocks eXtreme eXploration Passage Maker https://mobius.world/gardner-aluminium-goldilocks-exreme-exploration-passage-maker/
     

  15. Manny
    Joined: Aug 2018
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    Location: Glasgow

    Manny Junior Member

    Gemeni Explorer has already sold as far as i am aware. she is currently tied up in the same marina where we keep our plastic yacht.
     
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