First Post, Building a wooden boat

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by WesQ, Sep 25, 2011.

  1. WesQ
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    Location: canada

    WesQ Junior Member

    Hi all,

    first post here and I just wanted to share a project I m putting together in my garage. I'm kinda winging it and working without a paper plan. It's essential a spruce 2x2 frame that I m going to frame with plywood.

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    I havn't been taking into account any real math of boat building principals. Just using 8 foot 2x2's to build a the shape of a boat. Was going to ply frame the outside with 1/2 inch for the sides and 3/8 for the bottom and 4 inches above the waterline.

    Is basically a 14 foot flat bottom sailboat with 4 foot high sides and beam of 4 feet on the base but the edges are tilted out about 10 degree's so about 5 feet on the highest part of the beam.

    I was going to use 2 8 foot 3x2's for the mast that would in hinged and bolted so that it could fold for easier transportation. I m planning on car topping this beast.

    Any feedback would be kindly appreciated as I am pretty much a complete novice who has been reading about boats for a couple months and just want to get out on the water before winter and not do a terrible job of sailing it.
     
  2. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    It will look nice in the garden.. a pirate flag and crows nest and kids are going to love it :)
     
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  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I'll second Teddy's comments, maybe a 4th of July parade float on the back of a low deck trailer?

    The kindest advise anyone can provide at this point is to tell you to stop, before you cut up more materials, as you're attempts at self design haven't any portion or aspect of it, remotely close to being right or even acceptable. I'm not talking in terms of yacht like finishes or shapes, but literally something that might not tolerate it's only weight afloat and fold in half on launch day.

    This isn't a personal dig at you, though is admittedly harsh. There are free (yep, free) plans available as well as low cost plans. I have a few for less then 90 bucks and a couple for less then 50. Do yourself (and the USCG) a big favor and stop cutting and fitting. Download or purchase a set of plans. You'll use much less lumber, it'll float with the decks facing up and on the waterline you painted on it. Lastly, if you must attempt this, take a waterproof cell phone with you, on your first voyage and stay within swimming distance of the shore.
     
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  4. WesQ
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    WesQ Junior Member

    the frame is pretty solid. I can hang from any of the sections and was going to re-enforce all of the joints. It's symmetrical those pieces hanging out are going to be shaped and cut after.

    If it's planked and air tight it should float no?


    I know it wasn't a good idea though starting something without a plan, but it's symmetrical and sturdy
     
  5. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Welcome to the forum WesQ. Love the dog. I hope it doesn't drown.
     
  6. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Take the 2x2's you have laid out and build yourself a nice strong-back on which to build. At least look at some of the photos found on this forum to get a better idea of how to proceed.
     
  7. WesQ
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    Location: canada

    WesQ Junior Member

  8. WesQ
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    Location: canada

    WesQ Junior Member

    Sorry I'm a newbie.
     
  9. WesQ
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    WesQ Junior Member

    i ll tear down what I've done so far, I'm just wondering if it's possible to build a frame out of 2x2's and plank it with plywood and have it sail.
     
  10. FMS
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    FMS Senior Member

    I don't know who said it first, but reading thru old posts I've seen the following said several times and it rings true: "Do you want to have a good boat when you're done building this one, or do you want to learn about designing a boat?"

    Some people can understand by reading books. For myself, things often only really click when I learn by doing. I'll repeat what PAR said, if you want to build something off the cuff, keep it close to shore and have a friend in another boat follow you in case you need a tow or dry clothes.

    I have no doubt if you do build something off the cuff, the details will "click" for you much better after your first try. That's how it is for me. Once I try something with my own hands, I can do much better reading about it. Then seeing the details on paper clicks for me.
     
  11. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Yes, and as you scroll down the link, you will see the bulkhead stations have plywood forms attached for the building of the hull. The strong-back is not itself part of the boat, but after the hull has been built the parts of the strong-back can be re-cycled and used for other parts of the boat itself.
     
  12. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    The strong-back will enable you to build a more precise hull, but I have built a boat without one. The strong-back will make the task easier and help you to visualize the future shape of the hull.
     
  13. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Do some sketches of how you want the boat to look before building the frame, then build the frame to match your drawings.
     
  14. WesQ
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    WesQ Junior Member

    I already am stuck with the 2x2's cause they're cut so I can't take them back. In terms of free plans online there's this website with a bunch of stuff.
    http://home.clara.net/gmatkin/design.htm

    I'd have to bastardize the plans to use 2x2's. This dilapidated first try was a bit too ambitious. I'm going to keep trying, after I take apart what I've made.

    I'll just build a strong back like hoy said and put some 2x2 ribs over it and try again. I'll be damned if I don't take something out on the water after having spent all this money on materials LOL
     

  15. WesQ
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    WesQ Junior Member

    The 2x2's are limiting in that they don't bend very well, so I think I'd need to do something like this Spira frame in the video
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5iCzI9TbIw

    Thanks for all your help though I appreciate it.

    I don't have any friends who have boats or know anything about them or building them so this forum is a great help.
     
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