First Build

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by jth21usa, Jul 15, 2013.

  1. jth21usa
    Joined: Jul 2013
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    Location: Rochester ny

    jth21usa New Member

    I'm thinking about buying some boat plans and need some advice. I live on Lake Ontario and need something that will fit my 25 hp outboard. I know Dory's are easier to make (I've looked at Spira) I've also looked at Bateau (fast skiff 17). This boat will only be used for fishing, and I'm in no hurry to get anywhere. I have some questions:

    1. How bad would a Dory be in the chop of Lake Ontario? I would probably go out in anything over 2 feet. Should I even be looking at them?
    2. This would be a winter project (September to April) about 15hrs a week, is that enough time?
    3. I've had production boats so I'm a little weary of stitch and glue, do they really hold up over time?
    4. Is it impossible to make the fiberglass look good? I'm a perfectionist by nature and have no fiber glassing experience.
    5. Are there any designs that I'm missing?
    6. How significant is the time difference between a Dory and V hull or is all the time in the finishing?
    7. Is $2000 a good budget? I already have the motor.

    Thank in advance for any help anyone can provide.

    Justin
     
  2. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    The Bateau skiff looks nice, simple to build and it looks to be a perfect match for a 25 hp.

    The kits Bateau sell are competitively priced.

    Looks like 1200 dollars for the epoxy kit. 2000 dollars for the finished boat might be cutting it close. better throw in an extra 500 for fit out and an extra couple hundred for beginers mistakes and beginners waste

    Meranti ply is cheaper and would be a good choice.

    Stitch and glue plywood is cored construction. Very strong.... but it is only as good as the attention to detail and craftsmanship of the builder.

    Water ingress thru improperly installed fasteners and hull penetrations will rapidly deteriorate cored boats.

    DONT USE ANY MECHANICAL FASTENERS.
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    Dories are antique fishing boats, who's reputation is a bit over blown, especially in light of the fact, that most things called a dory now, aren't really dories, but dory looking skiffs.

    The Fast Skiff (Bateau) is a far superior boat and if you do get caught out in a some chop, you'll be much more comfortable than a dory like hull. I'd also recommend the Marrissa 18' from B&B Yacht design, which is a well thought out design geared for the 25 HP outboard. There's the PT Skiff from Bieker Boats, which I like less than the other two, but is still well thought out. Lastly, if you intend near shore fishing, you might consider the lowly 'ol clamming skiff. It's about as easy a boat to build as you can ask for and time tested, with minimal power requirements (she scoots good on a 25 HP). I have a couple of clam skiff designs, as well as about every other designer in the world. My skiff is built well, mostly with Lowe's/Depot materials and there's two versions, one built like a rock, the other is a heavier duty version.
     
  4. jth21usa
    Joined: Jul 2013
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    Location: Rochester ny

    jth21usa New Member

    PAR can you post a direct link to your Clam Skiff? I can't find it.

    Justin
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

  6. jth21usa
    Joined: Jul 2013
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    Location: Rochester ny

    jth21usa New Member

    Another question, Spiro designs say that you can use regular plywood where others are marine grade (which is NO WHERE around me) are his designs different or is exterior grade OK?
     
  7. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    When you build a boat you follow the designers instructions TO THE LETTER.

    If they specify Marine Grade ply, biaxial eglass and epoxy ... use it and nothing else

    If they specify old egg cartons soaked in Elmers wood glue..Follow their instructions.
     

  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    My Digger 17 also uses Lowe's/Depot quality plywood and yes you can use it, but the scantlings need to be adjusted, if you plan on a substitution from a marine grade to construction grade. Spiro's dory skiffs are way over the top, in regard to material use in the design, so the cheap plywood can be used, because it's overly thick and overly supported. Digger 17 uses a similar approach, though not nearly as much in materials and boat "parts" you have to cut out and install as the Sipra. The heavy duty version of Digger has a 1.5" thick bottom, which on a 17' boat is quite thick and tough, but this was the design requirement, a stout, tough, easy to build boat. With all the parts in a Spira build, you'll take twice as long as a Digger build. This is true of any modern build, compared to a traditional build (plank over frame).

    Yes, marine grade plywood is available near Rochester. Try Pittsford Lumber. They carry the good stuff and the cheaper APA grades of marine, plus supplies. This isn't the only place near Rochester either.

    Lastly, and again Dories aren't any easier to make than other flat bottom designs. Even Spira recognize his traditional dory like designs are heavy and has developed modern, lighter taped seam versions. A dory isn't the best powerboat, as it's a modified row/sail boat from 150 years ago. If you want a powerboat, you should start with one that was conceived as a powerboat from the outset. A clamming skiff, like Digger (or other design) or a V bottom skiff, would be more appropriate for your needs, than a dory or modified dory/skiff.
     
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