Final Loading Manual

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Leopard, Feb 19, 2022.

  1. Leopard
    Joined: Nov 2021
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    Leopard Junior Member

    Could you please explain me what is final loading manual for a ship? Class would like to check preliminary still water bending moment data. Though I have already specified the load distribution for different loadcases and shown calculation SF and BM using Maxsurf, why class is seeking for Final Loading Manual is not clear to me. Could you please provide me a sample of final loading manual? I would be glad if you could explain it what are the information I need to add in that document.
     
  2. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Loading Instrument is a procedure (normally a software) that allows the captain to know the situation of his ship in terms of stability and longitudinal strength, in any of the real load conditions, not theoretical, in which the ship is in every moment. It is specific to each ship.
     
  3. Leopard
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    Leopard Junior Member

    Hi, But class is asking for loading manual. It is in the design phase. Could you please tell me the content of a loading manuals?
     
  4. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    It would be typical loading scenarios that the vessel will have.
    For example:

    Maximum load
    Full Load
    Half Load
    Arrival Load

    The above will yeild different displacement, LCG and VCG, depending upon the type of vessel and various loading scenarios possible.
    And that is the purpose of the loading manual...so each loading condition can be explored to ensure each satisfies the rule it is being applied against.
    Rather than just assuming 1 condition of loading satisfies all.
     
  5. RAraujo
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    RAraujo Senior Member - Naval Architect

    I'm assuming you are talking about a loading manual that includes not only the elements of longitudinal strength of the ship but also stability elements.

    In the preliminary load manual you, probably, used calculated/estimated displacement and position of CG and weight distribution. In the final loading manual you should use the elements obtained from the inclining test and lightship survey and eventual corrections to the weight distribution.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2022
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  6. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    We have misunderstood your question. I think this text, which is not mine, will help you :
    "Cargo manuals are official and mandatory documents that are created taking into account the ESC code and SOLAS chapter 6 and chapter 7 guidelines, written by the IMO. These manuals are specific to each type of boat and are written taking into account not only the legislation but also its characteristics and the fixed and mobile devices it has. All this through a study process and always in the official language of the ship, unless it is not English, Spanish or French, in which case there will also be a copy in one of these aforementioned languages.
    The idea of this manual is to specify the best way to stow the different types of cargo, always bearing in mind that these measures to be applied keep the ship, people and cargo safe even in the worst known weather conditions.
    In addition to knowing that fixed and mobile materials are the minimum necessary and knowing 100% of their correct use, all crew members who are dedicated to stowing cargo should also be familiar with it in order to do it well and safely. It is also important to say that this manual is available to all of them and that it is also an obligation that they have complete knowledge of it."
     
  7. RAraujo
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    RAraujo Senior Member - Naval Architect

    TANSL, I think what you are referring to is the CARGO SECURING MANUAL...
     
  8. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Yes, I do. Also called cargo load manual.
    Perhaps the OP, knowing now that there are two manuals with similar names, would like to clarify which manual he is referring to.
    Note that in my first post I talked about loading "instrument".
     
  9. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    As RArajo notes:

    These are all supplementary to the Loading Manual.
    As noted, the Loading manual is to taking into consideration all possible loading scenarios, and then analysed against the SWBMs, shear forces, torsional, whipping loads etc on the vessel, at given speeds/wave heights etc. as per the rules being applied for Classification.

    Again, that is supplementary.
    Since this is a 'device' or 'instrument', such as strain gauges etc, to confirm what has been shown via the Loading manual, and is not to be exceeded.

    In simple terms, you calculate what the vessel's structure, what the vessel is Designed to do in a series of different load cases, because the structure is designed to satisfy this(ese) requirements of Class structural rules.
    And when the vessel is in service, i.e. it is now built and at sea, those values calculated and used for the structural design for approval by Class is monitored in real-time, via 'instruments' located onboard.
    These data are feed to a monitor in the wheelhouse for the Capt to check during the voyage, and is a log/record of the voyage and the values obtained. Just like a VDR of aircraft.

    That's it.
     

  10. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Post #9 : "Again, that is supplementary". It does not clarify anything, it does not contribute anything, but it does allow to deduce how far your knowledge in this matter goes.
    No one grows great by making others feel small. Great is he who succeeds in magnifying those around him.
     
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