Fibreglass boat question

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Garu1979, May 9, 2013.

  1. Garu1979
    Joined: May 2013
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Uk

    Garu1979 Junior Member

    Hello All,

    I am new here so hope I have posted this in the right forum. I have recently bought a 15' boat, i believe this used to be a sailing dinghy due to an old mast slot and also retractable centreboard. From research I believed this boat would be fibreglass with wood supports in the sole, but have recently discovered through removing old minging layers that the sole is pure fibreglass. There are a couple of holes which I have managed to cause in the sole.

    I am wondering if it would be wise on rebuilding from the base layer of fibreglass to add some ply in or purely as it was just to build up the fibreglass layers again to make it strong???
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2013
  2. Garu1979
    Joined: May 2013
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Uk

    Garu1979 Junior Member

    Anyone?????
     
  3. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
    Posts: 3,146
    Likes: 308, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1279
    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    Garu; more information is needed. Can you post some pictures? You say that it used to be a sailing dinghy. Do you intend to restore it to sailing condition or will you have another use for the boat?

    I presume that your reference to the sole means that there is some space between the "floor" and the outer skin. Is that correct? If so, there will almost surely be some stringers to support the floor. Adding ply may become problematic if that is the case.
     
  4. Garu1979
    Joined: May 2013
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Uk

    Garu1979 Junior Member

    Hello and thank you for your reply. I have attached some pics at the moment. I probably got confused in my terminology but there are def no stringers... just layers of fibreglass and I am guessing an outer coat.

    I have removed the straps and bits and pieces that can be seen and really I wanted to convert it into a boat for fishing. I do not intend to use a sail but perhaps add oar locks or an outboard on the back.

    In relation to the holes they are on the floor through the whole depth of the floor to the outside. I will try and add pics of them too.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Garu1979
    Joined: May 2013
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Uk

    Garu1979 Junior Member

    Also, should I leave the retractable dagger / centreboard in and how best to seal the holes in the transom that can be seen from the pic?
     
  6. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
    Posts: 3,146
    Likes: 308, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1279
    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    The holes in the transom are probably self bailers. Normally they would have gasketed doors hinged on the outside. Fill them in if you like. An easier fix is to renew the doors.

    The centerboard case will almost surely be in the way of the fisherman. You could remove the entire case and seal the slot in the bottom with the fiberglass that you will be using for repairing the other parts of the floor.

    The boat will need only a small engine, not more than 4 HP. Two Hp will be enough unless you expect to encounter stiff winds and/or tides. The boat will not be fast but it will move smoothly and quietly through the water at perhaps 5 MPH and not much more. It will be very economical to operate as the boat will glide through the water with minimum resistance, but that is true only for slow speeds.

    If you intend to row the boat, you may find that a skeg or fin of some kind is desirable. The skeg will be attached to the after end of the bottom. The reason for this is that the boat will have very little ability to track in a straight line without some sort of underwater "weather vane". The skeg will do no harm when motoring.

    As for repairing the boat bottom, that is problematic. If the glass structure has begun to delaminate,around the floor, then it is also likely to be in that condition elsewhere. Elsewhere includes the interior of the side tanks that you can not access.

    Some risk may be involved with this boat even after it is repaired in visible and accessible locations. Try to find someone in your area, who is well acquainted with fiberglass work. Have them assess the situation. It is entirely possible that the repair cost and the energy that you put into the repair work will not be a fair bargain.

    In other words, you may do well to give the boat a decent burial rather than try to save it. Any additional glass that you apply will need to be bonded with epoxy resin not polyester. Unfortunately epoxy is rather pricey. Polyester costs less but it is incapable of bonding reliably to old polyester and glass.

    Sorry to be the bearer of discouragement but I would urge you to proceed only on the side of practicality and safety.
     

  7. Garu1979
    Joined: May 2013
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Uk

    Garu1979 Junior Member

    Thank you so much for your help and very detailed reply. I will consider all that you have said and decide what to do. I will keep you updated as to how I get on.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.