Fiberglass wanted

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Fanie, Oct 11, 2011.

  1. Fanie
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Fanie Fanie

    Hello,

    I'm looking for for someone that can supply me with a 45 deg woven roving.

    The glass in reels should be 300mm wide

    with a stitch on both sides to prevent the glass from elongating when reeled off.

    Weight is common at 450g/m^2.

    Weave as in the picture, orange is the stitch.

    Thanks
     

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  2. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    I found 45 degree non-woven here: http://www.jamestowndistributors.co...me=Fiberglass Supplies&category=373&page=GRID

    Will keep looking for woven.

    Try here. http://www.fiberglasssupply.com/Stitch_and_Glue/stitch_and_glue.html

    "For small boats such as dinghies and kayaks often just a light weight fiberglass tape is used. In larger boats a knitted fiberglass tape is used. Many plans & designers will refer to it as a biaxial fiberglass tape, bias tape, or use nomenclature such as DB120 or DB1708. These are heavier fiberglass fabrics that have all the fiber on one plane orientated in the same direction and on the other plain turned and orientated in another direction. For taping the seams of stitch and glue boats double bias, meaning that the fibers are orientated at +/- 45 degrees, is what is used. Knitted fiberglass fabrics however have not been designed for use as a cosmetic fabric and often in areas where the seam will be seen it is top coated with a lightweight fiberglass tape or cloth."
     
  3. Fanie
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    Fanie Fanie

    Hi Hoyte,

    The glass must be in reels of say 25 to 35kg per reel or up to about 500mm in diameter. The glass is for a specific process.

    The glass tape is rubbish, it has to be proper fiberglass.
    The standard woven is 0 deg x 90 deg, I just want 45 x 45 deg.
     
  4. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    :eek: Oops! I'll look some more.
     
  5. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Attached Files:

  6. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    Another way to get what you are looking for is to use bouble bias matt !!
    Double bias is the cloth you are discribing and can be got with as little as 125 gram chopped strand matt on the back !!
    The salvaged edges make the glass a little more exspensive .
    Rolls with the matt on the back is more common as it is just cut from a standard roll of glass , any width you want .
    If you are using it with epoxy resin the 125 grams chop is next to nothing and if you use peelply over the top you can sop some of the surplus resin out anyway !!
     
  7. sabahcat
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    sabahcat Senior Member

    Why woven?
    Double Bias is stronger as the load path is straight, unlike woven
    And I would think would also use less resin as there are no gaps for resin to sit where the fibres go over and under, as in woven

    To get these widths, any width, I have had them cut from a full roll
     
  8. Herman
    Joined: Oct 2004
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    Herman Senior Member

    If you like multiaxial, then contact Selcom in Italy, they ship to for instance African Cats as well.

    Multiaxial in +/-45 is a cinch, can be slit in any width, without ragged edges, and rolls can be made in any diameter/weight you like.

    Selcom is a very flexible company and can do what many others are not willing to do.

    If you need only a small amount, I can provide you, but roll length is 50 meter. (cut from my standard rolls).
     
  9. Fanie
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Fanie Fanie

    The process is a winding one, in other words the jig spools the glass off the roll, pre-wet it and it goes on the jig. The problem with 0 / 90 deg glass is it doesn't form well with the shape of the jig, in other words there are bubbles between the layers when the jig goes thinner to one side. Almost like when you want to glass over a rounded corner, if the glass is at 45 degrees it forms well, if it is at right angle it doesn't form or forms very difficult.

    If the multiaxial will form well then I can use it. The sample pieces I got before had basically the same problem - it wants to remain in the direction it is wound without forming narrower or wider, even if you roll it with a roller.

    The process is quite fast, I layup about 100kg of glass in an hour, easy, if the process is sorted it will possibly be double that. The idea is to wound the glass over the jig, say it is a hull, then the glass spins the pre-wetted glass around the jig, you assist forming to the shape with rollers, then when cured the jig collapse and is pulled out the back.

    I've already made a couple of test pieces that worked well. I use a drive to rotate the jig and a dispensing trolley with transversial control to regulate the amount of layers wound. It's only the bloody glass that doesn't want to form properly.

    If I get the right glass on rolls to work right I may need quite a bit, anything from 300 to 1000kg at a time. WIll probably buy 1000kg's at a time.

    There is a glass weaver in South Africa who said he can weave the glass like that, but it's been a few years and every time he has a new story.
     
  10. Herman
    Joined: Oct 2004
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    Herman Senior Member

    contact "Andrea" from Selcom, who is the technical guy. (speaks English). Or Claudia, who is the export manager, and will discuss with Andrea.

    I think getting the stitching of the multiaxial right is the important factor here, and I am not an expert on that. You might get away with tricot stitch style, but please ask them.

    Here is a link to their website: http://www.selcom-srl.com
     
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  11. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    You have form it transversaly. The stitching prevents any longitudinal stretch..
     

  12. Fanie
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Colonial "Sick Africa"

    Fanie Fanie

    Hi Teddy,

    I can form it if the transversal movement is increased enoough, the problem is then you have a lot of cuts and starts to do which takes time. The windig process starts left and ends right, you don't have to move transversially left and right.
     
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