Fiberglass deck/chainplate repair

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by RandyRathmann, May 6, 2013.

  1. RandyRathmann
    Joined: May 2013
    Posts: 2
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Alabama

    RandyRathmann New Member

    I recently bought an '89 Watkins 30 and got a really good deal because previous owner drug top of mast across bottom of local rail road bridge. The top of the mast was repaired but I have discovered that there is damage to the deck because of excess pressure on forward side stays. The forestay came down but mast stayed up and now that I have sailed the boat a couple of times the deck has obviously delaminated where chainplate goes through. The chain plate is not attached to a bulkhead. It is simply a 4 " square stainless plate against underside of deck with chainplate welded to it. Underside of deck is covered by the prefabed fiberglass cabin shell. Any clever ideas on how to force or pump epoxy into the delminated deck would be appreciated.
    Thanks,
    Randy
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Pumping epoxy is not going to fix a structural damage like delamination. Some photos will help give you better advice. However, most likely the area will need to be cut/ground out and then repaired.
     
  3. RandyRathmann
    Joined: May 2013
    Posts: 2
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    Location: Alabama

    RandyRathmann New Member

    Not what I wanted to hear but what I thought I might. I have had nominal fiberglass experince, can you suggest a book on subject or where I might get some direction for this project?
    Thanks,
    Randy
     

  4. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    You may and probably do have a balsa cored deck. Water has been known to migrate quite a distance from where the water's coming in. Go inside and do some core sampling around the chainplates. Use a 1/4" drill bit and try not to penetrate the outer skin. "Map" the area and see if you have a rotten core (brown wet wood) or wet (fresh wood color).
    It best to know what you're up against before talking much about it.
    You can get a lot of help here and yes there are good books on epoxy repairs. Gougeon Bros put out a book which is fairly complete.
     
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