fiberglass boat structure repair???

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by slapsley, Sep 4, 2010.

  1. slapsley
    Joined: Sep 2010
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    Location: NW indiana

    slapsley New Member

    This is a simple question. When I repair the port to starboard structure under the seats of my fiberglass runabout, should the structure be as rigid as possible or should i allow for some flexability within the structure?
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Okay I'll bite, what port to starboard structure under the seats of what year, make and model runabout would you like us to comment on?

    I'm not being coy, but generally it's best to establish a base line from which we all can understand, such as the make, model and year of the boat, with pictures often being more helpful in showing what and where your concerns are.

    To make a grand guess, I'd say the "structure" should be fairly stiff, but I wouldn't add a bunch of weight trying to make it truly "rigid". Of course it's helpful to know what we're talking about, a pure GRP laminate, sheathed plywood, aluminum, steel, play doh, macrame . . . I know it's your first post, but help us out a little.
     
  3. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    As rigid as possible, within reason.

    -Tom
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yea, that's what my other half says . . .
     
  5. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Welcome here Mrs. Riccelli!





    :D couldnĀ“t resist:D
     
  6. slapsley
    Joined: Sep 2010
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    Location: NW indiana

    slapsley New Member

    The boat is a 1959 GlassCraft Citation, a 15 footer according to the registration. its all fiberglass but as far as GRP or macrame:) i couldn't say. I'll start posting some pics to help facilitate a proper response.
     
  7. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    A boat of that vintage should be solid fiberglass laminate, resin rich and rather overbuilt.
     
  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yep, it'll probably be a chopper boat with a heavy laminate (GRP), though I think finding wooden cores in the transom, sole, stringers shouldn't be discounted.

    If this is a the athwartship interior element I suspect, it could very well be over plywood or just a GRP sheet. GRP is quite weak in sheet, form so I would guess it has some shape to it or at least is triangulated into the hull shell (tabbing) or other elements of the interior. Hard to say without a picture.
     

  9. slapsley
    Joined: Sep 2010
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    Location: NW indiana

    slapsley New Member

    there is no plywood structure, just the glass. its under the seats and is sealed to the hull and sides of the boat, and has metal straps going from what would be the seat backs to the seat bottoms. My inexperienced guess is some sort of floatation chamber? and i sincerely hope it is overbuilt cuz it's pretty rough. it is basically a 2 piece boat, a top and separate bottom attached to eachother with screws under some trim. I really don't want to separate the two for fear that a layman such as myself might not get them back together. i am concerned with the transom as well, but one thing at a time.
     
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