fiber vs wood vs aluminum, which one it better and what is the best school in Canada

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by isslam akkilah, Nov 21, 2020.

  1. isslam akkilah
    Joined: Nov 2020
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    isslam akkilah CrazyWarrier

    Hello guys
    I do have a question about boats building I am totally newbie, and I am looking for schools to learn boat building and generally they are considering wood as their best track except VIU university in Canada they have a close track using aluminum as primary. However, what do you think is easiest, and the most in-demand boat type in market, and can me manufactured by one person. In addition to that, how much does each one of these types can last (fiber vs wood vs aluminum), and what is the advantages and disadvantages of each one of these.
     
  2. missinginaction
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    missinginaction Senior Member

  3. isslam akkilah
    Joined: Nov 2020
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    isslam akkilah CrazyWarrier

  4. Ike
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    Ike Senior Member

    The most used material in the recreational boat market is fiberglass. However, aluminum is also a popular choice in some regions particularly for work boats, and areas where conditions for boats are rocky. In other words where boats will take a beating. There are still some wooden boats being built but mostly by DIY, or custom builders. Schools tend to teach the basic fundamentals and those are most easily taught with wood. Building a wood boat teaches all of the basic design elements and components that go into a boat, no matter what material you build in. After that, learning to work in Fiberglas, composites, or metal is just an add on to the fundamentals.

    Which is better? None. Each has it advantages and disadvantages. One of the basic elements in building a boat is what it will be used for, and where it will be used. That usually determines what material the boat will be built with. For instance, if the boat is to be mass produced and sold to the public for generally boating use, fiberglass would most likely be the choice. If it's a work boat and will see rough use probably aluminum is best. If it's a one-off custom build, either wood or metal. In that case the clients preference may be the deciding factor.
     
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  5. isslam akkilah
    Joined: Nov 2020
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    isslam akkilah CrazyWarrier

    perfect do you know any school that teach aluminum boat building like the Canadian one I posted does not matter USA or Canada, but I am really into aluminum, because It survive long and I can do business with like who know you can own a fish shop and sale crayfish
     
  6. Ike
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    Ike Senior Member

  7. Barry
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Barry Senior Member

    As Ike said, if you are building a lot of boats and are willing to invest in a mold for each boat and do not have to customize a boat layout to suit a customers needs, then fiberglass has stood the test of time. Molds are expensive and
    need to amortized over many builds. I am sure there are others who can comment on the cost of molds for say a 40 footer.

    If you want to be able to build from 10 feet up to whatever, but say 40 feet, with various layouts, command bridge, varying beams, deadrise, then aluminum is a strong contender.

    If you have a maximum towing width and customers want to pull their boats out after each use, or after a season. You can pick a beam and deadrise, and use the same jig to build hulls from say 18 feet up to maybe 32. So the jib cost is
    a small part of the cost to build a boat. While many aluminum boats fit into the work boat category, there are some very finely fitted aluminum boats that rival the best made fibreglass boats. A quick look at
    Coastal Craft and Eagle Craft ( their non work boat fleet) to see how they stack up.
    There are a lot of middle of the road finished aluminum boats, that offer great amenities for fishing with compete live aboard capabilities. Kingfisher, Hewescraft, Thunderjet, the list goes on. Certainly the north west coast of the US and Canada
    have an extremely strong following.

    The aluminum hull part of building a boat, is a small part of the build though. Mechanical, electrical, electronics, stove, gray, fresh water and head systems are probably close to 2/3 of the cost of a total build.

    Wooden boat building is normally done by do it your selfer's with strong wood working abilities but they are not main stream production boats. For a one off, wood works

    Is the Westlawn school still in business. I thought that they were at one time the leading edge of boat building colleges?
     

  8. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Ike Senior Member

    Westland is still there but it is a design school, not building.
     
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