Felpro 90314-1 Intake Gaskets

Discussion in 'Gas Engines' started by mikealston2428, Sep 30, 2013.

  1. mikealston2428
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    mikealston2428 Senior Member

    Hi Guys,

    The Felpro Chev 350 gasket kit I purchased as the standard 90314-1 intake manifold in it.

    These gaskets fit all ports correctly.
    I need to know the Felpro gasket number for the gaskets with this port pattern with no holes for the crossover ports, I need these closed.

    My intake manifold is castiron if this makes any diffrence to gasket choice.:p

    Many Thanks,
    Mike.
     
  2. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    That's the first gen small block Chevy intake gasket and suitable for iron heads and intakes.

    If you have a "divorced" style of choke well (bimetallic spring type), you'll need the ports open or partly open. The same is true if you're using an EGR equipped intake.

    Did your gasket set come with a set of stamped sheet steel rectangles? This will block the ports and can be drilled to offer partial blockage.

    If you want the block off plate installed in the gasket, get FelPro 1204 gaskets. Conversely, you can just use a rectangular piece of stainless and cut them in yourself.

    [​IMG]

    This is what you've got (90314).

    [​IMG]

    This is what you want - FelPro 1204.
     
  3. mikealston2428
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    mikealston2428 Senior Member

    Wow yet again thank you very much Par for your clear and easy to understand answer, you have a lot of knowledge that for sure.
    I asked more than one of my local supply stores this very question and either got brushed off because I think they didn't know the answer.
    Once again thank you.
    Cheers,
    Mike
     
  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    It's a common misconception to backyard mechanics. They think you can just block them off, but the crossover does serve a purpose on stock or mildly modified engines. Most parts guys think they know what they're talking about and if you need a number for a 351 Ford oil filter, they'll probably know it, but not so much the subtle differences between the 5 or 6 different first gen SBC intake gaskets.

    If you do block off the cross over, you'll need an electric choke, on the carb and a non-EGR intake manifold.
     
  5. mikealston2428
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    mikealston2428 Senior Member

    My choke is the manual spring type
    Am I best to leave them crossovers open or put the insert with the smaller hole in it ?
     
  6. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Is it a manual or a spring? The spring type is what we call a bimetallic coil choke and is dependent on heat rising up from a closed well in the intake, just next to the plenum. The well has a small diameter tube that rises up to the choke housing, which warms the coil. If the crossover is blocked, it'll be hard to start in cold weather.

    If you have a manual (knob on the dash) or an electric choke, you'll have no problems with a blocked off crossover.

    You can convert a coil style of choke to electric (my usual choice) or manual easily enough.

    In your climate, the small hole insert will probably work fine, if running the coil choke. Personally, I prefer things to be automatic, so I'll put an electric choke on it, which is a simple and cheap upgrade. The same is true for a manual choke upgrade.
     
  7. mikealston2428
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    mikealston2428 Senior Member

    Choke is a Rockchester Quadrajet thermostratic coil
     
  8. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yep, this is what I figured. The carb has two connections to the choke housing, one is a vacuum line, the other is a heat riser tube, that comes up from a well in the intake. Vacuum pulls up heat from the well, through the typically hard line. This is what makes the coil contract and expand, operating the choke butterfly. This style of choke requires at least a hole in the intake crossover gasket.

    This is a common source for a vacuum leak on that particular Rochester. It's often over looked and can dive a shade tree mechanic trying to find it. The heat riser tube also tends to break, crack, not seat well and other wise cause trouble. Most just pull the cover off the choke, yank out that damn spring, plug the vacuum port and install an electric choke (1 wire, as simple as it gets) or a manual cable. If you insist, replace the spring (coil) and insure the riser tube isn't leaking, just to eliminate any issues you might have (it's cheap). In this vain a electric conversion kit is about $35 bucks at full retail, which eliminates all the associated issues with this puppy. A manual kit is about $15 bucks, but you have to remember to use it and more importantly stop using it, once the engine is warm enough.
     
  9. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    have we indentified whether it is a marine thermostat choke/manifold or a auto one?
    No vacuum on the marine version
     

  10. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Good point Powerabout. I always just hack these old mechanical chokes off the carb, replacing them with electric, if for no other reason than reliability. It's not much of and issue here in sunny Florida, but when I lived in the mid Atlantic, it was a common theme - mis-aligned riser tubes, rusted out well plates, broken coils, etc., so the usual course was to just replace it with something that wasn't going to fail and didn't rely on several parts just to operate.
     
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