Fastest way to dry wood

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by mariobrothers88, Jun 3, 2022.

  1. mariobrothers88
    Joined: Sep 2020
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    Location: San Diego, CA

    mariobrothers88 Senior Member

    Hi guys, I am getting some freshly cut meranti 2x4s and I was wondering what the fastest way to dry the wood would be? I was thinking of making a storage room and putting either an oven or a dehumidifier in the room with the wood to dry it as fast as possible. Do you guys have any better suggestions? Would you go with the oven vs the dehumidifier vs something else? Thanks for any advice!!!
     
  2. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    I think that a dehumidifier would be more effective.
    Although I think that your climate in Southern California is already pretty dry with low humidity, so this should help?
     
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  3. mariobrothers88
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    mariobrothers88 Senior Member

    Thanks bajansailor! This is in a tropical environment in southern Mexico.
     
  4. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Drying the wood super fast will lead to case hardening and warpage, twisting, checking.

    Drying the wood in a controlled kiln is the only way to do it fast and lower risk for horrors.

    If you get a stack, and no kiln operators around, where you are, if not too close to the Pacific, you can sticker it with one inch thick or 3/4" thick pine boards and use ratchet straps to keep it stable, put it under a rainproof cover and find a black tarp and cover all but say the bottom foot or so and it will probably dry in a month or 3 in hot sun. But if you don't sticker and strap it, all bets are off.
     
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  5. DogCavalry
    Joined: Sep 2019
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    DogCavalry Soy Soylent Green: I can't believe it's not people

    You gotta stick your stack, as I used to say. In the old days when I had a 15 acre woodlot, and a hairline that wasn't on the back of my head.

    And I couldn't shoplift a banana by hiding it under my potbelly.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2022
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  6. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
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    Location: Victoria BC Canada

    BlueBell . . . . .

    Fastest way is to burn it.
     
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  7. Will Gilmore
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Littleton, nh

    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    What is your plan for the wood?

    You live in a humid, semi-tropical environment. Drying your wood too fast and too much, then exposing it to a humid environment won't do it any favors.

    1 year per inch of thickness of properly stacked and stuck wood will give you the best working performance for that environment. Even kiln dried wood should sit in the shop for a month or so before you start working it.

    If you're going to speed the process along, invest in a moisture meter and practice patience in exposing your dried wood, as well as in drying it.
     
  8. Scuff
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    Scuff Senior Member

  9. Brad White
    Joined: Aug 2022
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    Location: San Diego

    Brad White New Member

    Hey Mariobrothers88,
    I live in SoCal and looking to build my first boat. Before i take the leap I need to see some self built boats. I have a Catalina 22 and have some ideas about using her mast and rigging, trailer and stuff on a faster safer boat. Is it possible to ask you some questions??

    Thanks,
    Brad
     
  10. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    @Brad White I also just read your other post asking about the Seaclipper trimarans - your best bet would probably be to start a new thread, and ask all your questions on this thread.
     
  11. Brad White
    Joined: Aug 2022
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    Location: San Diego

    Brad White New Member

    Thank you,,, I'm new to this site,,, trying to figure out how to do that??
     

  12. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    If you are starting a thread about Seaclippers, then maybe best to post it in the Multihulls section of this Forum -
    Multihulls https://www.boatdesign.net/forums/multihulls/

    Click on the 'blue' button in the top right corner called 'Post new thread' and start writing!
    You can add photos and other attachments if you click on 'upload a file'.
    Then click on 'Create thread', and you are away!
     
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