fast cats

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by wannabeboater, Jul 14, 2009.

  1. wannabeboater
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    wannabeboater Junior Member

    I've recently developed this interest in multihull sailboats, and the catamaran just sticks out the most to me. Although i'm creating the love for catamarans, i still don't know enough about them. So this is why I am here. I'd like a catamaran from 40-60 ft, that is luxurious and spacious, but not a slug. By luxurious i mean i'd like a functional boat with atleast 3 staterooms and 2 heads. I'd also like a galley that isn't very cramped, with some living space. I know this is a lot, but don't be afraid to reccomend boats on the bigger end of the list. Now to performance, i'm not asking for a race boat, but it would be nice to be around 20 knots in good conditions, and SAFE. I would be sailing in the atlantic and pacific, and possibly more. I'm not very specific but i think it would be better to have boats for the finishing of my search, thanks ahead.
    Patrick
     
  2. Alan M.
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    Alan M. Senior Member

  3. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    We have some real experienced Catamaran designers here on the board, use the search function to find them.
    Give it a thought to have a vessel custom built to your requirements! Contrary to common belief a one off is NOT more expensive per se than a production boat.
    And that was said by a production boat builder!

    Richard
     
  4. wannabeboater
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    wannabeboater Junior Member

  5. wannabeboater
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    wannabeboater Junior Member

    Thanks i will take that into mind, have you seen the bare bones project? That caught my eye, but im not sure if the design is good, performs well, etc.. if you know of some designs that have good reputations, please let me know. Also, safe like i said earlier, once again thanks ahead for any info
     
  6. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    No, have´nt seen that. I am in a third world country at present (Turkey) where utoube is censored.

    If you send me a mail (click my name) I´ll be pleased to discuss the requirements or give you some recommendations of designers. One of them is Richard Woods (just one, there are many), he likes to contradict me quite often, and calls me a Cat opponent, but his boats are not the worse.
    http://www.sailingcatamarans.com/

    Regards
    Richard
     
  7. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    Thank you Apex1. Didn't know there were "many" of me though!!

    To wannebeboater. 40-60ft is a big jump. Volume increases by the cube, so a 60ft cat has nearly 4 times the room of a 40ft.

    How many people will be sailing with you?? You can get 4 double cabins, big heads, galley and saloon in a 35-38ft cat.

    Smaller boats are easier to handle and you can sail in more areas because of air and water draft restrictions.

    Also remember that a 60ft cat will be around 30ft wide and there are very few places you can slip a boat at that width.

    Obviously you don't have a budget problem, so I suggest you charter a few different cats to get a feel of what they are like - but remember not all cats are the same - just as not all monohulls are alike.

    Hope this helps, keep asking questions

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
  8. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Well, we all learn here you know.........:D
    And you once made a statement that there were too many Richards around here.........................sic

    Regards
    Richard
     
  9. wannabeboater
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    wannabeboater Junior Member

    5, 2 adults and 3 children with the occasional extra 4 adults, the reason i would like bigger is because more waterline, so faster, and i suppose it would be safer for my dream of an atlantic crossing. Since your a designer, i expect you can set me straight, but if you know any 35 ft atleast that meet my requirement i will take them into consideration.

    Apex1, if you search the bare bones project in this part of the forum, it should come up i believe bob oram helped out

    Once again thank you very much for the great information.
     
  10. masalai
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    masalai masalai

    As Frosty or someone else has said "...I resemble that..." as I often adopt the persona of a "Richard Cranium", so I doubt you are the only one to have that identity - I have found many and apart from your name you are not amongst those :D:D:D ...

    A cat that size, I would suggest would need permanent crew? - I do not want to run a hotel so have 2 double berth spaces - re-assigned all the other space for personal use - in a 39ft lightweight and hopefully fast cat... See my links below... Hopefully launched before April 2010...
     
  11. wannabeboater
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    wannabeboater Junior Member

    I am now leaning towards a smaller cat if i need a crew. And if its capable of doing what a bigger cat is then it meets my requirements. =] masalai, that design has very nice lines, my kind of taste. When it is launched please tell me the results, the cost to build, the time, and how many people worked on it. I love this forum, so much help =]
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2009
  12. masalai
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    masalai masalai

  13. wannabeboater
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    wannabeboater Junior Member

    thank you, do you know of any other sites with more info on the 39' C?
     
  14. masalai
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    masalai masalai

    Have a look to the Bob Oram design link - (bottom right are links to some others) - only 2 of us ("The Scrumble Project" in Darwin and "My Little Piece of Peace", myself) - - build close to Hervey Bay, Qld, Australia and you almost become part of the family, for I have found Bob's support, (regular visits and guidance), to be excellent...

    My shed space may be available sometime between Christmas 09 and April 2010, rental is very reasonable...
     

  15. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    I agree with Masalai's boat speed link article.

    I have once done 1000 miles in 5 days, Antigua to Bermuda. That was racing on a fully crewed 55ft monohull. I have sailed 650 miles in 3 days on my 35ft 8 berth Banshee catamaran, racing 2 up back from the Azores.

    I have often sailed 100 miles in 12 hours and even more often averaged over 9 knots for over 6 hours when cruising.

    So it is rare to do consistent 200 mile days. Some of you will remember the excitement when Phil Weld won the 1980 OSTAR in record time sailing his 50ft trimaran Moxie. But he averaged under 8 knots.

    I quote from an article on my website:

    "Most catamarans are advertised as being “fast” for many people are easily seduced by the thought of more speed. However, when cruising, speed must always be related to comfort. Just because a catamaran sails upright to windward and doesn’t roll downwind, it doesn’t mean you should always sail one fast.

    On a monohull you tend to sail as fast as possible all the time. On a catamaran you only sail as fast as you want to go.

    I often compare boats with cars: 6 knots is 60mph, 8 knots is 80; 20 knots is 200. So in reality not many cruising multihulls genuinely do 20 knots in flat water.

    A monohull is like an old car; you can keep your foot on the gas all the time. In a new car it’s often hard to judge how fast you are going, it’s so comfortable. In practice, few people buy the fastest car; rather most want a car that is comfortable to drive and handles predictably. Even so, you quickly learn not to drive fast in traffic, in the dark or in bad weather.

    It’s the same with a catamaran, where the real trick to successful catamaran sailing is to know when to slow down. Thus I prefer to cruise offshore at a 6 knot average rather than 9. That’s because even 9 knots can be uncomfortably fast when passagemaking, mainly because you are living on board, not just out for a day sail.

    I’ve found that peak speeds are about double the average speed. To average 9 knots you’ll often do 18 and later you’ll swear the log never read below 12. Sheer speed is not the main reason we go sailing, for if we really wanted to get somewhere in a hurry we’d use a powerboat. Instead, what is important is to have a boat that is fun to sail. Having a responsive boat and one that will do what you want when you want it are the real differences between boats that sail well and those that don’t. "


    Certainly if you have children on board you are unlikely to average high speeds.

    A Transit 38, one of my semi production designs, may suit you. There is one sailing in Virginia, built in part by John Lombardi, another just launched in the UK and a third building.

    My own 34ft Romany is currently in the St John River, Fl. We return to it Oct 30 and then sail south to the Keys for Christmas, so you would be welcome to visit/sail later this year.

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
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