Fasco 110 Fast Set Epoxy Glue

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by aaronhl, Feb 18, 2014.

  1. aaronhl
    Joined: Aug 2012
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    aaronhl Senior Member

    According to some websites FASCO 110 FAST SET EPOXY GLUE sets in about 10 minutes, but fully hardened in 24 hours. The question is how long would I need to have the wood clamped for to make sure it's staying put. How long until you can sand?

    http://fiberglasssupplydepot.com/FASCO-110-FAST-SET-EPOXY-GLUE.html

    I am used to using DEVCON 30 minute epoxy which has about a 5-10 minute working time but only need to have everything clamped for about 3 hours

    Aaron
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Why are you using these fast set epoxies? I ask because these formulations typically have a quite dramatic lower modulus of elongation (compared to other formulations), which can lead to creep and failures if highly loaded.
     
  3. aaronhl
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    aaronhl Senior Member

    Come again??? Hahaha Anyway the reason I am using it is because I have a part of the boat (pictured below, lately all my threads have been about this boat) that have multiple edges. If I plan to build several of these pieces at a time, the fast epoxy will allow less time in between steps, meaning shorter time to complete

    Any other chemical chemical you would recommend?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Well, since it's a model, you'll be fine, but generally these fast set formulations can be problematic under load. You little boat can't develop the loads necessary, to a moot point in this case.

    These fast set goo's will be "green" in 5 - 10 minutes, so the clamps can come off, but it is still curing, so don't try to machine the parts for at least a day. Clamping pressures should be just enough to hold the parts, no more (unlike other glues). You can accelerate this process with some post curing. Raise the temperature into the 110 - 120 range and you'll half the cure time, meaning you can work the parts in 12 hours. If you take the temperature to 140, you can start beating the part up in 6 hours.

    These time estimates assume you'll need to max out the joint strengths in machining operations (or whatever). If you're not going to really stress the joints, you can handle them fairly roughly after just a few hours. As to sanding on the still curing goo, well this is just up to the environment and the specific epoxy formulation. Some stiffen up quickly, while others seem to take longer. Do some tests with post curing and see what you can get away with.
     
  5. aaronhl
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    aaronhl Senior Member

    Ya seems like the fast 110 would work, I am going to buy some for the next builds (cheaper than the Devcon 30 minute)

    Thanks for your input
     
  6. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    Cheaper still would be titebond III. A half hour should be enough time to remove clamps. Slower, yes, but check the price. And it's certinly waterproof enough for a model boat. The "open time" is 10 minutes, which you might appreciate. I'd not want a glue to set up too quick.
    Anyway, check out the Titebond website.
     
  7. aaronhl
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    aaronhl Senior Member

    Funny you should Metion Titebond III I used it all the time in my other wood working projects and builds. I guess I overlooked it as another glue for this project, thinking I needed something stronger and the ability to stick to foam. The inside of this sponson (pictured below) has two 1/4" thick plywood stringers that are laminated to 2" wide foam that are used for homes. Since there is limited wood on wood contact when the outside pices are glued, do you think the thin plywood skinning would be able to stick to the foam?

    [​IMG]
     
  8. aaronhl
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    aaronhl Senior Member

    Just experimented with some plywood, foam, and Titebond III. There was a bond after clamping the wood to the foam, but not strong at all. I was able to pull it off very easy.

    Wonder what else would work well??
     
  9. pauloman
    Joined: Jun 2010
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    pauloman Epoxy Vendor

    it would be better to use a 'normal epoxy' so that you have plenty of work and clean up time. certainly you can let your parts sit overnight or longer. why the rush? they fun part is in the buiding....

    there used to be a commercial where they fixed a diving board with emers glue - that and wood glue are excellent alternatives - easy to work with and cheap

    Paul Oman - MS. MBA
    A.K.A. “Professor E. Poxy” - “Old Goat” - “Epoxy Guru”
    www.epoxyfacts.com
    www.everything-epoxy.info
    www.epoxyguru.com

    epoxies since 1994
    Member: NACE (National Assoc. of Corrosion Engineers) -- SSPC (Soc. of Protective Coatings)
     

  10. aaronhl
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    aaronhl Senior Member

    Ya I could think about using regular set epoxy. Setup time isn't a concern I could set each piece up in less than 2 minutes. I would prefer to do 3 pieces in a day rather than 1. Trying to rush to be efficient, less time (less work) time better spent at toher things than "watching paint dry"...in this case epoxy.

    Maybe adding a thickener to regular epoxy would work. Epoxying is the longest part of the build, cutting wood is simple and quick
     
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