External 'on deck' shaft drive: video.

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by rustybarge, Jul 5, 2014.

  1. rustybarge
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 533
    Likes: 3, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 37
    Location: Ireland

    rustybarge Cheetah 25' Powercat.

    2 people like this.
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 14,147
    Likes: 540, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    There is no such thing as "engines with zero drag". It seems like an inefficient setup with a lot of exposed moving parts.
     
  3. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    looks awful and dangerous. much better to use an auxillary outboard than all that rubbish cluttering the deck.
     
  4. lucdekeyser
    Joined: Aug 2004
    Posts: 138
    Likes: 3, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 51
    Location: Belgium

    lucdekeyser Senior Member

    reminds me of most efficient pedal powered boat setup of Rick Willoughby.
    [​IMG]
     
  5. rustybarge
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 533
    Likes: 3, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 37
    Location: Ireland

    rustybarge Cheetah 25' Powercat.

    LOL...!!:D

    All it needs is a pladdle wheel drive as well.
     
  6. d1970
    Joined: Jun 2012
    Posts: 24
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: canada

    d1970 Junior Member

    That looks like something I'd improvise in the middle of the ocean to get home after a seized prop :)
     
  7. WestVanHan
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 1,374
    Likes: 56, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 746
    Location: Vancouver

    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    This is great....this may the the 70-80 year old barge I saw a few years back.

    Note the term "barge" and not brand name like " Sunseeker" or "Azimut" nor "Benetti".

    How can a diesel outboard or outdrive do the job any better,cheaper,more reliably than this?

    Anyways,as one of the very members who actually spends a lot of time aboard-I've been out for almost 3 months- many times I could have used something like this.

    Just last week I was pushing my boat around a remote bay in a remote inlet hoping the tide wouldn't go out much more....as it was my props ended up in the mud.

    Anyways,keep on having fun being negative-I'm back out for another month-fishing,kayaking and enjoying life.
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 14,147
    Likes: 540, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    A Z drive can do it better by being able to steer and provide thrust at a better angle. It is more reliable because it is not a cobbled together contraption. Also, there are not a bunch of exposed moving part than can cause injuries. If a propeller set in a tunnel gets stuck in the mud, the rest of the boat is aground and not moving regardless of propulsion system.
     
  9. jehardiman
    Joined: Aug 2004
    Posts: 2,601
    Likes: 255, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 2040
    Location: Port Orchard, Washington, USA

    jehardiman Senior Member

  10. lewisboats
    Joined: Oct 2002
    Posts: 2,329
    Likes: 126, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1603
    Location: Iowa

    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    "Portable" being a relative term...
     
  11. bpw
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 291
    Likes: 4, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 34
    Location: Cruising

    bpw Senior Member

    Having recently seen the damage done to a friend who fell into a moving prop shaft, this looks pretty scary without some guards around the moving parts, would also be real messy if someone fell overboard at the bow.

    Not sure I see much advantage over an outdrive or outboard motor set-up
     
  12. jehardiman
    Joined: Aug 2004
    Posts: 2,601
    Likes: 255, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 2040
    Location: Port Orchard, Washington, USA

    jehardiman Senior Member

    True, it is amazing what is considered "portable" in a shipyard with the right equipment.
    [​IMG]
     

  13. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 3,826
    Likes: 161, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 971
    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    Definitely before the nanny state.

    The first thing I thought of was back amongst farmers in Minnesota and Wisconsin and how mangled up they would get when they got wound up in the power take off, fartin' around with the balers, conveyors, choppers and such.

    Let me see...a narrow, sloped steel walkway and right where you have to change direction while avoiding a hot exhaust pipe there is a bunch of slightly elevated cables, a pulley and a completely exposed universal joint with a great big snaggy bolt churning away. Add a little rain for slippery, what could go wrong? It's kind of humorous, in a way.

    It's interesting to see what lengths they went to in the past to do what they had to do.

    Translating the video comments brought out this
    So, it's called a side screw or a lame wing. I don't know what punt the lily means, but it sounds kind of descriptive so I might start using it.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.