External Gas Filler Cap

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Liam Conway, Jul 9, 2019.

  1. Liam Conway
    Joined: Jul 2019
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Pennsylvania

    Liam Conway New Member

    Hello, I have recently discovered boat building, please pardon any missed terminology. I have found a boat design by a company called Glen-L. (14' Zip - twin cockpit runabout-boatdesign https://www.boatdesigns.com/14-Zip-twin-cockpit-runabout/products/378/) While I like the boat overall, it feels incomplete. This boat is meant to be used with an outboard motor, I'm thinking if I do end up building it, I will use this, Yamaha 40 HP 4-Stroke F40LEHA Outboard Motor https://puarto.com/yamaha-40-hp-4-stroke-f40leha-outboard-motor.html?gclid=EAIaIQobChMItbGOvu2o4wIVB2SGCh0DYwc1EAQYAiABEgLY6_D_BwE. However, unlike boats that are built by companies, this lacks a gas cap, please excuse me if I use the term wrong, but it's the filler cap on the outside of the boat, where you would normally put the gas if you went to a (Boat) gas station. However, non of the videos online have answered my question. The gas tank is located at the bow underneath the front deck, you can see it from the cockpit. But I want the boat to feel more finished, so I would prefer to be able to gas up at a dock easier. My family and a few other close friends share a house at Lake George, NY. The camp's boat is a 2002 Chaparral 220 SSI. It's an inboard-outboard and has the kind of filler cap that i'm talking about. I'm sure you could find it on almost any boat. My second concern is the primer bulb. On our boat in NY, it doesn't have one, as it is an inboard-outboard. I am wondering if there is a way to automate it, or remove the need for it. With the gas tank being at the front. I would like the gas tank to be at the front, iv'e seen people talk about using gravity, but I don't want to risk anything. If both of these are possible, and you know how to do it, please let me know! Thank you.
     
  2. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
    Posts: 2,196
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    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    Is this a permanently installed tank or a portable tank? If it is a portable then the cap is on the tank itself. If it is a permanently installed tank then it should have a filler tube (actually hose) that goes up to the deck or gunwale and has a fill fitting on the top . The cap is built into the fill fitting. You can get them with a lock or without. See PERKO Inc. https://www.perko.com/catalog/non_epa_fill/fuel_system_components/ or Attwood Marine http://www.attwoodmarine.com/store/category/integrated-fuel/components-parts/deck-fills
    See here for diagrams of permanently installed fuel tank systems Boat Building Regulations | Boat Fuel System | Fuel Tank Diagram http://newboatbuilders.com/pages/fuel_tank.html When people talk about gravity feed they are referring to the tank being higher than the fuel inlet on the engine. The fuel then can gravity feed to the fuel pump on the engine so the engine does not have to primed. that's how it works on an inboard. Otherwise the fuel pump on the engine has to suck the fuel up hill to the engine. Actually this is not a problem on inboards. The fuel pumps on inboards do not normally need to be primed . They are self priming. But an outboard engine needs to be primed first, that's what the squeeze bulb is for. Portable tanks are usually near the engine and don't need long hose runs. The engine manufacturer supplies a hose, with a squeeze bulb, that simply plugs into the tank. With a permanently installed tank at the bow you need a long hose run back to the outboard. This should be USCG type A hose. But since it's an outboard you will need to transition near the stern, from USCG type A fuel hose to the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) supplied hose with a squeeze bulb, to prime the engine. These setups are quite common and you can get all the parts needed from any marine retailer or online supplier. And no you should not eliminate the squeeze bulb. Just so you know, which modern fuel systems you may not have to do this very often. I have a small outboard on my 18 foot Sea Ray (an I/O) that I use for trolling. I prime it only at the beginning of the season. I've never had to do it again unless I unplug the hose. It holds the very slight pressure (about 1 psi) easily.
     
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  3. Liam Conway
    Joined: Jul 2019
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Pennsylvania

    Liam Conway New Member

    Thank you! All of this has helped greatly. I just wanted to confirm a few things, in the diagram, it shows the grade valve connecting to the vent hose. Is there a certain valve that allows 3-way connections? Additionally, is there a certain keyword I'm missing when I search "Vent with a Flame screen"? Thank you, you have helped greatly.
     
  4. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
    Posts: 2,196
    Likes: 166, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1669
    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member


  5. Liam Conway
    Joined: Jul 2019
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Pennsylvania

    Liam Conway New Member

    Thank you so much. You have been extremely helpful.
     
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