Extending hull under Euro transom Grady White 268

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by Frank Kacerek, Mar 29, 2019.

  1. Frank Kacerek
    Joined: Mar 2019
    Posts: 2
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Cape May, NJ

    Frank Kacerek New Member

    I have a 268 Islander that I am considering extending to running surface of the hull to the transom. On this model the "bottom" stops at the scuppers and trim tabs. By extending it the result would be a hull similar to the newer 270 Islander.

    Current boat has Yamaha F150's on it and could use the additional running surface and floatation to improve the ride.

    Looking for ideas on how to approach this and maybe find someone in Cape May area to do the work or do it myself. Current thought is to leave trim tabs and drain plug where they are. Build out the structure off the existing hull, cover with fiberglass panels, foam fill the void and finish edges.

    Thoughts/suggestions welcome. No I'm not considering buying a 270 Islander! Thanks...

    IMG_0169.jpg
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 7,636
    Likes: 255, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    More pictures of the boat might help. I am not sure what is inspiring your plan, but it might not be as easy and successful as initially imagined.
     
  3. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
    Posts: 659
    Likes: 102, Points: 43
    Location: Colorado

    Blueknarr Senior Member

    Mr Efficiency has hit the nail on the head.

    Adding a false bottom is straight forward, but fairing it true is highly time consuming.

    I haven't run the numbers, but how much performance different will a 1 or 2% change in bottom length or buoyancy make?

    IMO the potential gains don't justify the efforts.
    But, please tell us exactly what is troubling your boat's ride. And how the false bottom will improve it.
     
  4. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 7,636
    Likes: 255, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    That is good advice, you can't "fix" a problem without clarifying what the problem is.
     
  5. Frank Kacerek
    Joined: Mar 2019
    Posts: 2
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Cape May, NJ

    Frank Kacerek New Member

    Grady White changed the hull design around 2000 to accommodate the extra weight of the 4-stroke engines. Currently the boat could use more lift in the rear particularly at medium speeds. Its a 10 knot or 20 knot boat with nothing in-between. I would like to improve mid-range performance.
     

  6. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 7,636
    Likes: 255, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    You could "fill in" the pod to become a continuation of the bottom, but engine height will need to come right down with it, that could be a problem. My instinct would be to try bigger tabs before any surgery, I know they don't really kick in till at least 15 knots in a heavy type of boat, but with more size, it may help.
     
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. Wellington
    Replies:
    36
    Views:
    2,508
  2. cdre
    Replies:
    11
    Views:
    8,511
  3. E350
    Replies:
    14
    Views:
    179
  4. fallguy
    Replies:
    14
    Views:
    158
  5. SeaWeavers
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    169
  6. Mattskii89
    Replies:
    22
    Views:
    488
  7. fleix
    Replies:
    13
    Views:
    551
  8. E350
    Replies:
    38
    Views:
    916
  9. Joey2682
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    218
  10. brokensheer
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    463
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.