Everything Old is new again - Flettner Rotor Ship is launched

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by rwatson, Sep 1, 2008.

  1. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    The lift from the 'buckets' only has to be greater than the weight of the whole plane. Actual altitude is controlled by the angle of attack and the forward thrust of the propellor. eg. An airship derives lift from the hydrogen gas, but the altitude of the zeppelin is a function of the tail fin and the propellors.

    Banking is a function of ailerons , which are totally absent in a rotor wing, so pilot control would be a problem in a full size plane.

    Modern F1 racers use the 'rotor' effect somewhat. The wide exposed front tyres, with the top rotating forward, creates significant downward thrust.
     
  2. 1J1
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  3. Pericles
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  4. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Fantastic. It had the first photos of Flettners second Rotor ship, the Barbara, that I have seen
     

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  5. rwatson
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  7. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    It looks like SHELL is going to install trial Rotors on some of their ships

    "Copenhagen, Helsinki, & London – 14 March 2017: Norsepower Oy Ltd. in partnership with Maersk Tankers, The Energy Technologies Institute (ETI), and Shell Shipping & Maritime, today announced that it will install and trial Flettner rotor sails onboard a Maersk Tankers-owned vessel. The project will be the first installation of wind-powered energy technology on a product tanker vessel, and will provide insights into fuel savings and operational experience. The rotor sails will be fitted during the first half of 2018, before undergoing testing and data analysis at sea until the end of 2019. Maersk Tankers will supply a 109,647-deadweight tonne (DWT) Long Range 2 (LR2) product tanker vessel which will be retrofitted with two 30m tall by 5m diameter Norsepower Rotor Sails. Combined, these are expected to reduce average fuel consumption on typical global shipping routes by 7-10%."

    https://norsepowerltd-public.sharep...borate to test wind propulsion technology.pdf
     
  8. rwatson
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    Video showing working Rotors on Norsepower Ferry, $200,000 savings in Fuel per year

    Rotor.png

     
  9. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Rotor2.png
     

  10. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Note to self - great way to build a lightweight Rotor
     
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