European sterndrives / propulsion ahead of america?

Discussion in 'Sterndrives' started by Paul aka watertaxi, Jul 6, 2009.

  1. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    I´m sure they would have done better with the latter.
     
  2. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    They copied the cooling system not the engine. What did BMW know about marine engines?

    So tell me what diesels did BMW use?
    or are you ashamed they had to go to Italy for diesels?

    So why did Merc take over....BMW? Did BMW pay Merc to take it off their hands??
    Merc certainly threw everything BMW designed in the BIN only kept the Italian VM engines
     
  3. CDK
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    CDK retired engineer

    May I summarize that BMWs were not as resilient against abuse as the American competition and that they were more difficult to repair?

    Maybe they expected the boat-owners to behave like the majority of BMW drivers.
    And that surely was a major mistake.
     
  4. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    CDK
    yes
    Stronger in some area's and weaker in others I would say.
    If you operated in fresh water, never tilted your drive and the boat did 25mph I guess they would last a very long time and in that scenario possibly longer than a I drive.
    Cheers
    Powerabout
     
  5. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    Powerabout, Next you're gonna' tell us Toyotas don't get the mileage numbers they advertise? What about everyone's preconceived notions?
     
  6. apex1

    apex1 Guest

     
  7. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    apex1

    the 7 12 35 and 50hp diesel inboards were Hatz, not bad at all.
    The 150 190 636 were VM's
    Just like the first diesel Range rovers although they had a 4cyl VM

    someone please tell him.....

    I'm trying too think of any pre or war time German marine / marinised engines..anyone know?
     
  8. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    burmeister & wain, were they german, die industrie
     
  9. rambo!
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    rambo! Junior Member

    b & w were Danish...wiki says....
     
  10. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    I didnt know that...
    but I meant engines you put in small boats not engines you could put smallboats into
    High speed diesels or petrols
     
  11. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    B&W was Danish, now is MAN owned, Industrie is/was Dutch.

    Deutz built marine engines at a time when none of the US manufacturers did even exist! Pre war manufacturers were MAN, MWM, Deutz, Kaelble, Jastram to name just a few and only the smaller engines. Neither the US nor the Italian, or any other industry had anything comparable at these days.

    And due to the fact that early BMW boatmotors have been produced, 1920 the Bootsmotor M4 A12, 8ltr. OHC, I still doubt any sort of copying.
    And why should a company supply their own Diesel engine to Opel (6 cyl. straight in Omega and siblings) and buy a foreign product at the same time?
    The first BMW diesel car came 1983, the 2.4 Tdi was the fastest diesel car at that time. And it was a BMW engine.

    And we had not being talkin´here about one and two cyl. diesels did we? Hatz btw is a very good little manufacturer, and a BMW neighbour.

    Richard
     
  12. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    Apex1
    I would be interested to see a photo of the old 8ltr OHC job.

    The 3.5 (150-190 ) ltr straight 6 is probably twice the size of the engine in the Omega. It had a cast iron block with integral main bearing caps.
    Aluminium individual heads.
    It was also marinised by VM so ready to go ( but without the VM logo on the heat exchanger)
    At the time the VM held the world water speed record for a diesel..a fact they used in promoting it.
    If you see one the VM is cast into the block in quiet large letters near the front.

    Mercury only wanted engine supply and if BMW made diesels of that size they would have just bought them.

    I can see no other reason for Mercury to take on the rest of the BMW stuff which they promply ditched.


    Ask you local MerCruiser dealer he will tell you.
     
  13. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    The BMW of 1983 was a 2.4ltr. straight six, they had only that one. If there was a larger displ. engine in the units it could´nt be BMW of course. But searching for old manuals or parts you find the 150/190/636 units specified as 2.5ltr. just with different power settings.

    I do´nt have a Photo of that old 8ltr. OHC, how could I? Just say you do´nt believe me, thats honest!?
    Richard
     
  14. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    Apex 1 sorry to offend I meant i would like to see one not because I doubted you but because I am interested.
    Possibly people have restored them as a collectors item?
    Cheers
     

  15. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    No idea, and I know about that engine only from BMW history documentation at their museum. No offense taken btw.

    Richard
     
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