Estimated cost of boat design?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Cannonball, Sep 8, 2010.

  1. Cannonball
    Joined: Sep 2010
    Posts: 6
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Sitka, Alaska

    Cannonball Junior Member

    I really like certain layouts of sailboats.But unfortunately when growing up in alaska you stick to a strict doctrine of motorized watercraft. I was curious if it is even possible to build a boat/yacht similar to the pictures that I have attached. Essentially the purpose of the boat would be as a liveaboard/coastal traveller. Since I live in southern california but would like to visit family back in alaska during the summer times.

    Requirements: Overall length Roughly 80'. Width roughly 20'.
    coastal travel. Semi-Self sustainable, eco friendly (reverse osmosis filters, solar panels, bio-diesel engines). enough room to live aboard comfortably(see concept below).

    As stated below a similar construction is that of the FPB 83

    The pictures are just slightly edited pics of the wally sail 80...I know that these yachts are expensive. I am just curious if it is possible to re-construct a similar concept and use less money in the process.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. daiquiri
    Joined: May 2004
    Posts: 5,373
    Likes: 252, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3380
    Location: Italy (Garda Lake) and Croatia (Istria)

    daiquiri Engineering and Design

  3. Cannonball
    Joined: Sep 2010
    Posts: 6
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Sitka, Alaska

    Cannonball Junior Member

    Actually I have seen the FPB 83 before...I havent seen the FPB 64. I forgot about that design. thank you for that information though. The only thing that I would change would be the cabin. Smaller and more streamlined...
     
  4. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
    Posts: 2,307
    Likes: 191, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2281
    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

    I doubt you'll want 14' draft in a powerboat.....you won't be able to find a berth and motion at sea will be awful......
     
  5. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 15,184
    Likes: 923, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    The mast on a sailboat and the sails, dampen the rolling motion to a great extent. Preferably on a powerboat, you would design a beamier hull for more initial stability. Do you have a location for the build in mind?
     
  6. Cannonball
    Joined: Sep 2010
    Posts: 6
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Sitka, Alaska

    Cannonball Junior Member

    Thank you for that bit of information. That was one of the points that I was curious about. What about a trimaran design? similar to what was used as the earthrace boat. But I guess that still doesnt address the Draft of the boat. Well thanks to Daquiri for sending me those links for the Dashew offshore boats. the only difference is that I am looking for something that either has no cabin, or a cockpit styled cabin.

    [​IMG]

    I think a more likely design would resemble something more like this.

    [​IMG]

    Thank you to daquiri
     
  7. Cannonball
    Joined: Sep 2010
    Posts: 6
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Sitka, Alaska

    Cannonball Junior Member

    Well I am not entirely sure yet. I know of a few boat builders in alaska, But I am not sure if they would be up for a task like this. Most of them build fishing vessels between 14-65 feet.
     
  8. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    I would not focus too much on a builder now. A boat that size can easily travel on her own keel to the new home port, no matter where built.

    But you should narrow down your requirements in a so named design spiral to have a sound start.

    The wild guess, that FRP would be probably the way to go, for example, is not true. Aluminium is a superb material for the intended purpose. And sure the far superior to FRP in any case. On top of that, it is the cheaper material for a one off! (given the skills of the builders are as good in either material)

    The FPB is a rough basis where I would start from, refining the design when the pro´s and con´s of each issue is weighed out.

    Start here:
    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/boat-design/design-spiral-where-start-building-boat-28580.html

    Regards
    Richard
     
  9. Cannonball
    Joined: Sep 2010
    Posts: 6
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Sitka, Alaska

    Cannonball Junior Member

    Thank you for the advice Richard. Essentially I like the hull design of the FPB, but I am looking for something different as far as cabin design, or no cabin at all. I really appreciate everyones advice and comments I have already learned quite alot.

    When considering which material to use for the construction of the boat I come to a crossroads. My background is in Auto racing, so most of my issues deal with referencing to my experience in that department instead of boating...such as what is feasible and what is not. Cost/benefit analysis...etc
     
  10. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    One of the biggest advantages of a motorboat compared with a sailor is the view we can enjoy. Living in the basement is just ****. Of course all sailors cope with it, but if they could, they would like a wheelhouse or saloon above deck level. That must not be a five storey condo, of course.

    Forget almost all the materials you know from car racing. They are not found on cruisers of your desire. There are GRP boats circumnavigating, true. But they are rarely in the hands of the knowledgable.
    On the barefoot routes is a saying: over 50% of the passage makers are of metal, the rest are American........ (no offense intended)

    On the same barefoot route I found out, that, whenever I had sailors on board my motoryacht, they were sitting on the bridge, enjoying the view, and they stuck there as chewing gum to the pavement.

    Another point is the "save money in the process" issue.
    You either pay per m³ in a light displacement vessel, or per ton in a average or heavy displ. boat.
    The former is the more costly approach in general.
    Leaving the rig out, to achieve a less expensive approach with a sailboat hull is not a way to go. Sailboats are NOT seaworthy when rig and keel are gone!

    A true coastal cruiser with even transoceanic capabilities would be:

    1. shorter
    2. cheaper
    3. more comfortable
    4. friendlier in it´s motions
    5. roomier

    than the shown Wally, redesigned to your requirements (as far as I understand them).

    Here are some examples (especially the North Sea Trawler) which could roughly fit your bill at substantially lower cost than a FPB. Read the following threads II to IV as well, when you like it.
    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/boat-design/perfect-passagemaker-style-within-genre-34092.html

    Regards
    Richard
     
  11. Cannonball
    Joined: Sep 2010
    Posts: 6
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Sitka, Alaska

    Cannonball Junior Member

    None taken, I find that american boat design is silly. I lived on boats for 45-60 days at a time and never once did I think about TV or having silk sheets...I live a semi-rugged lifestyle, so my vehicles have been designed that way. Now I am trying to see if a boat can be as well..

    I have two reasons why I say No cabin, or Small cabin. 1, I remember back when I got my first boat (boston whaler) and driving it, having the wind whipping across your face with the spray coming across the bow....I want to be able to have that feeling. 2, because I hate how alot of american boats are designed. The whole triple decker square boxy design. I want something that flows, and is streamlined. I want functionality over luxury.
     
  12. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    I understand.

    But having a nice view when underway or mooring is not luxury, thats just part of the fun. And when functionality is the priority, it will be hard to beat the Trawler mentioned above.

    But imagine to stand on the poop when underway!

    Another point you may have missed. A sailor has to sit in the elements to watch them and the sails. On a motoryacht you must not suffer from fatigue and cold kidneys, but you should have a proper helmstation to watch the sea and traffic!
    Light, modern, streamlined is possible as well. Though rarely practical.
    But belive me, you do not enjoy passages on a open deck! Your whaler did not travel from San Francisco to Vancouver!

    Regards
    Richard
     
  13. WestVanHan
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 1,374
    Likes: 56, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 746
    Location: Vancouver

    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member


    Those are a few of the reasons I dislike sailboats...along with climbing up and down the equivalent of a stepladder all the time.
     
  14. daiquiri
    Joined: May 2004
    Posts: 5,373
    Likes: 252, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3380
    Location: Italy (Garda Lake) and Croatia (Istria)

    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    And yet another one is the resale value of the boat. There are not many people who share the romantic vision of a brave sailor who gets splashes of cold salty sea in the face all the way from California to Alaska.
    So when the time comes to change the boat, you might get very little (if any) money for such a particular kind of vessel. Unless you intend to build the boat and then to keep it untill it falls apart, of course. :)
    Cheers!
     

  15. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
    Posts: 2,307
    Likes: 191, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2281
    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

    I think we all like that at times....that's what the flying bridge is for.

    One of the difficulties of being down low will be poor visibility, especially when mooring or maneuvering. A good bridge from which you can see the edge of the boat all around is a blessing when maneuvering a big boat in a tight spot.

    The first two of these are mine, the last I just admire....not sure of the origin any more.

    Barkerartsm.jpg

    369.jpg

    bateau-a-moteur-motor-yacht-open-93883.jpg
     
    1 person likes this.
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.