Epoxy protection.

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by LP, Jul 17, 2013.

  1. LP
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    LP Flying Boatman

    Is anyone using any kind of skin/hand barrier cream/"liquid glove" type product to supplement gloved hands while working with epoxy? Or, possibly a stand alone barrier when working with semi-cured epoxy? I think that I'm protecting myself properly for the "wet" work, but if I'm sanding between coatings, I may not wear gloves because of the heat and perspiration build inside the gloves and my nitrile gloves aren't up to the task of a strenuous sanding session. I'm also curious if a skin barrier might also reduce fiberglass itch.

    I did a quick internet search and there are some skin barrier products available. Many are pricey and I'd like some feedback on products in use if anyone is using them.
     
  2. HakimKlunker
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    HakimKlunker Andreas der Juengere

    It is advisable to use skin protection, but not all of us follow this consequently...
    When things get wet, sticky and rough, I often put on cotton gloves with latex over it and then cotton gloves again. However, the fingertip feeling is much reduced.
    For the arms there are paper sleeves available, but I think that they are too hot in warm weather. Alternatively I sometimes use cut off ladie's nylons
    (on the arms only :p)
    Fibreglass itch: A colleague uses a medicine that is originally meant against hay fever. It is a antihystamine called 'simtec'. He is very satisfied with it.

    Whenever possible, I use tools with dust control and keep the working area as clean as reasonable.
    Creams and lotions are at the bottom of my list. I do not know how much of the stuff ends on the object of work and there spoils the product. Same counts for sweat of course.
     
  3. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Yes indeed...cotton gloves for general work and hand sanding .

    I use barrier cream occasionally...normally not. Dont know if its effective.


    Your best defense is a clean workshop....good vacume cleaner and relentless cleanup.

    Ive got a cheap household bagless vacume for shop, work surface, dust removal and it does a great job .

    Horizontal surfaces like work, assembly, tables collect alot of partialy cured expoxy dust.

    Workoveralls become heavily contaminated..wash often
     
  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Cotton gloves offer no protection. Barrier creams come in two varieties, water soluble and the costly stuff. If you use the cheap stuff, sweat will wash it off.

    Hair spray works well, applied to the hands, wrists, bend of the elbow, around the neck, waste band, etc. Baby powder also works, though not as effectively as hair spray.

    PR88 is the product many use > http://www.pr88.com/products/products_pages/pr88.htm < It's water soluble, but effective.
     
  5. HakimKlunker
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    HakimKlunker Andreas der Juengere

    Not meant to be :).
    The rubber glove protects the skin; the cotton protects the rubber glove.

    It is a personal approach perhaps: I avoid cosmetics and lotions where ever I can. I can afford it - never have been handsome anyway...
     
  6. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    These aren't cosmetics, but tools and they do work. Those that work 'glass a lot ,have used these products and tricks for years, as a 'glass itch isn't especially enjoyable, even if you're as ugly as me.

    In tropical environments wearing even more clothing, like cotton over rubber gloves, just isn't what you want to do. Hell, getting me to put on shirt is a chore, in the summer time.

    PR88 is a 30 bucks a can, which isn't cheap, but it works. You can buy the cheap stuff for 5 bucks a can, but you'll notice the $30 stuff works better right away. I have a few cans of cheap Suave hairspray on shelves in the shop. I use these to protect me and equipment too. I've heard comments about the hairspray with folks in the shop, when I do a test on them. I spray one of their elbow bends, let it dry then sprinkle milled fibers on both. They of course brush or blow it off and I wait about an hour and ask which is itching. They usually just shut up and buy some damn hairspray for themselves and I'll bet I never get any credit for the revelation.
     
  7. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Cotton gloves under rubber gloves works best for me.

    I dont like wet sweaty rubber gloved hands all day
     
  8. HakimKlunker
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    HakimKlunker Andreas der Juengere

    To those who read here silently: I did not advocate NOT using protective creams. (My use of the term 'cosmetics' was indeed somewhat misleading)

    Have never heard about the hair spray before and will test it right away.
    If no one gave credit until now: the greatest people of history became famous only after moving on from this world.
    I wish you to live long and prosper.

    >>> Michael: Against the sweat I mentioned cotton underneath as well.
    But it is no fun to walk around like an astronaut...

    What I noticed (and others perhaps as well): The itch is strongest after a period of not working with glass. After a week or so, the irritation becomes less. (?)
     
  9. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I knew your comment were tongue in cheek Hakim. Hair spray and baby powder are industry stand byes and long proven (decades). I wish to live as long as a Vulkin too . . . prospering along the way would be nice as well.
     
  10. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    olive oil
     
  11. LP
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    LP Flying Boatman

    That's an interesting one. Initially, I would think that olive oil would attract particulates and hold them to your skin. (Unless you meant to say Olive Oyl. :p)

    Yup, the heat and humidity makes it hard to protect yourself properly, Paul. We've had more heat and humidity up here recently than down your way.

    Thanks to all for your input. The PR88 will be getting a shot.
     

  12. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    No sweat LP (especially in an A/C'd shop :p). I've noticed we've been a good 10 degrees cooler then you for a while now. Living in paradise has it's advantages. As an example, what do you see on a NY beach in January? We have scantly clad teenagers, with perfect tans down her at that time of the year. God we got it tough . . .
     
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