Epoxied Brightwork

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Corpus Skipper, Jan 5, 2004.

  1. Corpus Skipper
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    Corpus Skipper Hopeless Boataholic

    I refinished some teak brightwork and sealed it in epoxy (I hate the sand/varnish routine). Then I noticed a few areas where it looked like the epoxy had worn off (light areas) after only a few weeks. The wood was well sanded and clean before epoxy coating, what's gone wrong? :confused:
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Epoxy has very little UV resistance. It seals the wood but has to be coated.
     
  3. Corpus Skipper
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    Corpus Skipper Hopeless Boataholic

    What would you suggest coating it with? I really like the color the epoxy gave the wood, and I'd like to keep it that way. Thanks Gonzo.
     
  4. duluthboats
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    duluthboats Senior Dreamer

    A varnish with a good UV rating is the best way to go if you want a clear coat over epoxy. You may have some other problems here; no finish should do what you have described in that short time. Maybe moisture trapped under the epoxy?

    Gary :D
     
  5. Corpus Skipper
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    Corpus Skipper Hopeless Boataholic

    I am 99% sure the wood was dry. It was unfinished and had been treated with teak cleaner and oil, maybe that's the culprit. The "worn" areas are all at corners, but they haven't been abraded by anything. I'll try the varnish (darn, here we go again). Thanks Gary.
     
  6. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    If it had teak oil that is the problem. Wood has to be dewaxed, degreased and free of oil. Any varnish with UV filters works well over epoxy.
     
  7. edneu
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    edneu Junior Member

    Sanding sealer and Epoxy Question

    I am finishing the restoration of the woodwork in a Boston Whaler which was started by someone else. The replacement wood is Mahogony. My preferred technique would be to seal the wood with epoxy and then coat it with varnish for UV protection as discussed in this thread.

    However the person who started the woodwork, applied sanding sealer but did not varnish over the sealer on some of the wood. This is all new wood never finished before.

    I was wondering how I should prepare the surface for epoxy sealing? Can The sanding sealer be removed? Does it need to be removed. Should i just forget the epoxy,varnish the thing and be done?
     
  8. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Epoxied bright work without a cloth skinning doesn't seem worth the cost or effort. Epoxy will help in the build stage of a nice varnish job, but without the glass isn't very useful otherwise.

    Sealing bright work with epoxy will require a UV inhibitor like varnish, though I'd only use the varnish and save some money and sanding time.

    Unless I'd expect some abrasion resistance from the piece. I'd then use epoxy and finishing cloth or Dynel.

    Teak doesn't like epoxy as well as some other woods and bonding trouble is a well reported thing.

    To prep the sand sealer treated wood for epoxy, sand it to expose the grain and have at it.

    The teak that's showing some discoloration should be sanded down and cleaned up, before re-expoxying the areas effected. For what's it's worth, a varnish only on teak would have produced a very similar color and effect the epoxy is doing for you, with the UV protection to boot.
     
  9. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    WestSystem makes an epoxy varnish that works pretty well. It doesn't flow much, so the last coats need to be with regular varnish. Two coats build up to about six or eight or varnish.
     
  10. Corpus Skipper
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    Corpus Skipper Hopeless Boataholic

    Thanks folks. Anyone used Bristol Finish? Someone recommended this at my marina. His sailboat has lots of brightwork, so I'm thinking this may be a good recommendation.
     
  11. SailDesign
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    SailDesign Old Phart! Stay upwind..

    Craig,
    You probably (actually, no, the word is "definitely"...) don't want to hear this, but...
    Varnish has been around for centuries, and has been proven to work, even if it takes work to keep it nice. Why change a known winner?
    OTOH, teak is best in all applications if not treated at all. It is almost rot-free, it fades to a nice silver-grey colour with time and exposure, and (if left to achieve this state) actually gets less slippery when wet. Why even bother with the varnish?

    Steve (pulls on his Nomex undies and runs..)
     
  12. Corpus Skipper
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    Corpus Skipper Hopeless Boataholic

    My Dad and I both own the boat, and he likes brightwork. (which is great, because HE does most of the sanding/varnishing, tho I help too. I'm "the mechanic") Any rate, that's why we finished the teak. We shouldn't have to varnish as often with the epoxy basecoat tho, right? :D
     
  13. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Everyone has their own favorites in products to use, varnish is no exception and has brand loyalty taken to high levels. Personally I use varnish with the most UV inhibitors I can find. The better products have high content and the price usually reflects this fact. I pick anti-fouling bottom paint with the same idea in mind, but look for the most killing agent I can get in a gallon. Epifanes, Bristol, etc all have their fans, but the test is how do you like the stuff, how well has it worked for you.

    Don't know, then stick with a brand name and try some. Don't buy into a single local salt's ideas, but ask around your area and see what brand name keeps coming up and get that. You never know, that guy recommending it may have a piece of the local Bristol distributorship and would make a buck selling you a can or two. He may not even know how to lay varnish, but is a good salesman and jobs out his bright work to a kid who uses the stuff from Ace Hardware (which ain't that bad for cheap stuff)

    If anything the epoxy under the varnish will not help the UV break down of the varnish. In fact I'd be inclined to take extra care of the varnish coated epoxy as you don't want to have to play catch up with the epoxy 'cause you let the varnish go to long in the sun. Keep it clean, keep it wiped down after use or wetness and keep up with a reasonable varnishing schedule. This is the only way to save your epoxy coated bright work from the damage of mother nature's wrath.
     

  14. Sketch
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    Sketch Junior Member

    It's not clear, but Sikkens Cetol gives excellent protection. The color takes some getting used to, but from a pure maintenance perspective it's hard to beat; it goes on easy, and only requires light sanding (not stripping) to reapply.

    When finishing an oily wood like teak I like to wipe it down with acetone immediately before applying the finish. For the first coat I like to thin with 25% Penetrol and use a rag. Again be sure to test an area, or better, check out a boat finished with the product, to see if the color and sheen work for you.

    Kevin
     
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