Engine for Antarctica

Discussion in 'Motorsailers' started by Letsgosailing, Sep 13, 2018.

  1. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    You’re very right. 60-80 knot winds are the routine between low pressure systems that come through every 48 hours like clockwork. Just when a storm blows past another starts within 12 hours or less. Hard to catch a break. Building sized waves means high speed downwind sailing. Once you proceed into 50-60 degrees of latitude you’re well into the ice line with either pole (last latitude line an iceberg was recorded). Here you typically enter crazy big waves + random chunks of ice. Radar is needed to spot both squalls and icebergs. That means someone on the radar 24/7. Crew needs to rotate shifts for the radar duty. Fresh set of eyes every hour or so to ensure we were constantly alert and ready to change course.

    Just can’t imagine an outboard except perhaps for limited use in a protected harbor. Weather can change very rapidly.

     
  2. Letsgosailing
    Joined: Sep 2018
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    Letsgosailing Junior Member

    I do understand the scope and reasoning against the idea of having an outboard as the primary engine. The purpose of the discussion was not that I'm dong this regardless but are there any issues I've not thought of. The concept was more based on modifications of the outboard to make it appropriate.
    • Cabin heating can be provided by a diesel stove
    • Use the yanmar dtorque 111 (Diesel)
    • Generator in previous engine compartment
    • Modify the cooling to a keel cooled closed system+ external exhaust so not to pollute the waters
    • Possibly bring air + fuel filters inside for ease of maintenance.
    • Mount the outboard on a setup where it can be raised from the water and brought into the cabin. (track/rails through modified companion way)
    Maybe it is a madcap idea but I know outboards are used on tenders down there. I'm just sure technology has progressed enough to be able to take what thousands of boats across the globe do as standard and apply it to a sailing vessel
     
  3. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Some outboard pros and cons are discussed on the below linked thread, but the Antarctic region is a bit worse than the there discussed application, so the mentioned disadvantages are also more severe there.


    BTW, the origin of your current avatar came up on the Random Picture Thread as an aside of this post, scroll a bit down for the Shackleton ads.

    Good luck !
     
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  4. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Tenders operate near the shore and can be maintained dockside. You might want to contact Yanmar to discuss your plans for the dtorque outboard. They're marketing it primarily for shore based patrol & rescue vessels (typically government operations). If you have a slot in the stern of your vessel where it can be raised up clear of the water while sailing that might work. Bear in mind that slot will cost you cabin and/or storage space that could have otherwise been used on a regular sailing yacht with an inboard diesel.
     
  5. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    I recall that thread Angélique. I recall there were concerns about carbon monoxide from the exhaust, and it also noted the loss of cabin space, additional hull drag and other factors. However, it can anchor in the shallows and that appears to have been his main goal. I wonder if he has built it yet.
     
  6. BlueBell
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    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    I like how the Gulf of Alaska commercial fish boats run their engine coolant through the deck rails to keep tons of ice from forming.
     
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  7. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Joseph T mentioned early on in this thread the very fine aluminium vessel 'Magnus Zaremba'.

    Here is a link to another, very similar, vessel, specifically designed for high latitudes by Ed Joy (he used to work with Chuck Paine).

    Seal - 56' High Latitude Exploration Yacht https://www.edjoydesign.com/seal/

    Notice the similarity? This type of vessel seems to have evolved as being the best all-rounder for the 'average' person who wants to sail to high latitudes.
    Why try to re-invent something 'better', when others have done it for you?
    And please, don't even think about using an outboard motor (not even a diesel one) as your main propulsion unit. If it was viable, the odds are that someone would have done it already.

    For more info about Seal, have a look at her Owners' website - Expedition Sail -- charter yacht Seal in Alaska, Antarctica & South Georgia https://www.expeditionsail.com/
     
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  8. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Excellent info bajansailor. The Seal is very well equipped. The pilot house is a great viewing area if the weather kicks up. After all, in many cases it's all about the view on these adventures. If the weather is bad the enclosed pilot house/viewing area would be a big plus. One would be inclined to use a vessel like this and bring an inflatable dinghy with portable outboard to venture ashore. That's what most yachts do today.

    Update: A quote from Seal's owner on his lifting rudder:

    "We had an incredibly positive experience designing SEAL with Ed Joy, who did all the detail work on our 56-foot expedition boat while working at Chuck Paine and Associates. SEAL is an unusual boat, with a lifting keel and rudder, and Ed’s rudder is the envy of the Antarctic charter fleet. We hit an uncharted ledge at 8 knots and the rudder lifted as designed without losing any paint - many boats would have lost their rudders in a similar hit. On the rudder, in particular, he provided a amazing blend of innovation and practicality, and also managed to keep the construction costs down. SEAL has sailed about 35,000 miles since launching, including to Greenland, Antarctica (twice), South Georgia, and numerous trips through the Cape Horn archipelago and the Beagle Channel.” — Hamish & Kate Laird, owners of the 56' high latitude exploration yacht SEAL"

    Welcome to Ed Joy Design of Camden, Maine https://www.edjoydesign.com/home/

    I would say look no further for a polar yacht with plans available for building. Truly a special boat concept.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2018

  9. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Related thread just started, relevant keel cool info might come up there...

     
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