Engine for Antarctica

Discussion in 'Motorsailers' started by Letsgosailing, Sep 13, 2018.

  1. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Good for beer and preserving small/micro marine biology samples! We used electric coolers in the Southern Ocean. They worked very well and were BIG and roomy. Just strap them to a bulkhead so they don't bounce around and you're all set.
     
  2. Letsgosailing
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    Location: Wales

    Letsgosailing Junior Member

    I hope you don't them muddled and end cracking open a live one. What sort of things were you collecting?

    I don't think a fridge is going to be on the priority list for us in the high latitudes. We may regret that decision en route south eventually but we'll struggle through.
     
  3. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    I've just came across such system in the Dutch sales ads...

    ‘‘ Zeilklaar voor zowel zomer als wintertochten door Dickinson kachel en geïntegreerde kielkoeling. ’’
    =
    ‘‘ Sail ready for both summer and winter trips by Dickinson stove and integrated keel cooling. ’’

    1974 built steel Koopmans design 9 × 3.05 × 1.52 m (note it speaks about ‘‘winter trips’’ and not about high latitudes)

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2018
  4. JamesG123
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    JamesG123 Senior Member

    Or today heatpipes have gotten cheap enough and commoditized enough to be an economical choice. Very compact and zero maintenance.
     
  5. Blueknarr
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    Blueknarr Senior Member

    last month I did post grounding repairs on a glass 18 ft jet boat. The hull was recessed so heat exchangers didn't interrupt water flow. The rock penetrated the hull in three places but only dented one of the coolers. Many frustrating hours spent trying to work a cutting wire thru the goop gluing it to the hull
     
  6. Letsgosailing
    Joined: Sep 2018
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    Letsgosailing Junior Member

    DO you know what adhesive was used? Was it just coincidence the damage was superficial or was it that the coolers were just stronger than the rest of the hull.

    That sorts the loss of engine warming the cabins then. Have a stove installed then the engine could be moved outside.

    Could it be worth converting an outboard to be keel or hull cooled? For the purpose of having a closed closed cooling system.
    I imagine it wouldn't be hard and you could move the pump inside for ease of servicing as well as fuel filters. Again, to me, the theory sounds like it has great benefits.
     
  7. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    It looks like a true sailboat owned by true sailors, has Aries wind vane steering and such, so it's plausible they only run the engine while going in and out harbors and locks, and avoid lee shores as much as possible, or fight their way away from it, using the engine only in emergencies then. During not in use the engine and the cooling system could even freeze when not everything is filled with antifreeze coolant. Also you can't carry enough fuel on such a boat on long trips to run the engine a lot. So better have the stove for cabin heating.
     
  8. Letsgosailing
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    Letsgosailing Junior Member

    That's much like how we sail already (were a hardy bunch). Were quite used to avoiding the engine as much as possible already. Which is sort of reason for trying to forgo all the structural compromises you may need to make to fit one.

    I'm still in the mindset that we need the hulking great thing only for the ballast. Which even then could be replaced with extra stores and equipment...
     
  9. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Best check out Roger Taylor, he does high latitude sailing without an engine . . . .

    Yachting Monthly - Solo voyager Roger Taylor and his boat Mingming II - January 10, 2013


    The Making of Mingming II part 1 the other parts

    Yachting Monthly - Ocean-going yacht for under £ 6 K - January 17, 2014 - (US $)

    [​IMG]
    highly recommended​


    Yachting Monthly - Ocean sailor finishes his new boat - February 26, 2014





    Yachting Monthly* had an interview with Roger about the purchase, rebuild and modifications of his ‘‘new’’ boat Mingming II.

    * March 2014 issue, page 3 and page 72 to 75.

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    see bottom right corner
     
  10. Letsgosailing
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    Letsgosailing Junior Member

    I've been very interested in Roger Taylor's Ming Ming1 and 2 and some other Jester Challenge designs. In fact this project started with me intending to somewhat clone Ming Ming 2 but I would need to upscale it for more crew members and as such I feel we would need an engine as a matter for my crews safety. Also a bit of interior colour would be in order.

    But for certain I will be looking for past threads on his use of a lamp post as his mast and it's suitability to take a beating.
     
  11. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

  12. Letsgosailing
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    Letsgosailing Junior Member

    Oh, that's interesting in many ways. Thanks.
     
  13. goodwilltoall
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    goodwilltoall Senior Member

    Arctic travel is fine but have heard going to antartica is prohibited or so burdensome to recieve permission that you just forget about it unless under the auspecies of an"approved governmental organization". UN regulations such as an enviromental study assement (min $250,000) which can then be rejected, take your excrement with you, no motorized vehicles of any type allowed, etc.. you get the drift.
     
  14. JamesG123
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    JamesG123 Senior Member

    That is a good point. There is an astonishing amount of red tape in regards to Antarctica.

    Yachts - IAATO https://iaato.org/yachts

    Bear in mind that these guys are the Antartic tour operator's association so they are biased towards their own business and excluding others, which is largely what the Antarctic Treaty was all about.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2018
    JosephT likes this.

  15. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Indeed. Go there for a damned good reason. There is a polar code now. Strict rules. No poop. No discharge of oily substances, etc. Contamination in these regions stays much, much longer. Fewer microbial life forms to devour waste.

    In short, leave no trace you were there.
     
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