Electrical Conduit

Discussion in 'OnBoard Electronics & Controls' started by rasorinc, Nov 23, 2014.

  1. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
    Posts: 1,854
    Likes: 71, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 896
    Location: OREGON

    rasorinc Senior Member

    Anyone have strong opinions about PVC # 40 conduit vs galvanized steel conduit? all my AC and DC main lines will be run in conduit. Boat will be used in fresh and salt water. Any other options. Thank you.
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 14,281
    Likes: 588, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Plastic will not corrode. It is accepted by most electrical codes, so it should be safe. There are a couple of things to consider:
    1- It is not fireproof
    2-It becomes brittle and shatters at very low temperatures.
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    It does stand relatively high heats, though does melt, it's not acceptable in commercial applications nor potential impact or abrasion areas, except in low voltage runs and will sag in engine rooms unless supported at much smaller intervals than codes require, if you want it to look neat and tidy. I'll use 16" - 24" clamping distances in engine rooms, for this reason. For your needs Stan, PVC will be fine.
     
  4. sdowney717
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: Newport News VA

    sdowney717 Senior Member

    ENT conduit that flexy bendy stuff. I am using it on my boat.

    ENT is thinner than PVC. Wires in conduit are derated on how many amps they can have. Does thick PVC retain more heat than metal conduits, so more derating?

    Mine is the heavy duty VOHG with very good self extinguishing
    [​IMG]
     

  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 473, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    ENT isn't rated for impact or abrasion either, though it bends good, most use "WeaterTite" or "LiquidTite" from an adapter or bulkhead fitting, for these bends from conduit. Personally, I like to make really neat bends in rigid, then adapt to the flexible (ASTM D 922) conduit, for the final run from the rigid to the engine (or whatever). The weak link is the flex, which is rated at 220 F (105 C) and not as tough as the rigid. Most pleasure boats will use the split loom style or the light PVC conduit.
     
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