Efficient, economical low-speed hull?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by DianneB, Aug 19, 2010.

  1. DianneB
    Joined: Jan 2010
    Posts: 88
    Likes: 6, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 74
    Location: Manitoba

    DianneB Junior Member

    It has been a life long dream of mine to build a sternwheeler, something very much along the lines of the Mississippi riverboats of the 1800's only in the 30 to 50 foot class.

    In my 20's I would have built authentic live steam but now, approaching retirement, diesel is more appealing.

    I have been boating long enough now to know that I would like the space and comfort of a houseboat, would enjoy being able to beach nose-first, and I am quite content to put along a 4 to 6 Knots so the overall characteristics of a sternwheeler suit me just fine.

    However, I am close to retirement and money IS an issue. The above-water structure and outfitting is no problem but the hull style and construction are a concern - how to build an efficient low speed hull very economically.

    Most standard hull shapes seem to be designed for efficiency at high speed or carrying large loads at low speed. What is efficient at speeds of 5 to 7 Knots?

    I have been thinking along the lines of a 'stitch & glue' catamaran hull - something a little better than a barge.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks!
     
  2. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Paul Riccelli in Eustis Florida has almost exactly drawn what you are looking for.

    When I recall right, he had several sizes of that style.

    He was one of our most respected members here before he left the board a few months ago.

    Regards
    Richard
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 19, 2010
  3. DianneB
    Joined: Jan 2010
    Posts: 88
    Likes: 6, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 74
    Location: Manitoba

    DianneB Junior Member

    Thanks. I have tried to contact him this summer but with no response.
     
  4. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    I´ll try to mail him.
     
  5. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

    This is a different (more traditional) take on the subject, done a long time ago....

    Sternwheeler.jpg


    A square barge is fairly efficient at low speed. Also it allows accommodation inside the hull. A catamaran will have more draft and be far more complex to build.
     
  6. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

  7. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 3,818
    Likes: 156, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 971
    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    I like that. There are very few actual plans for sternwheelers around. What is the hull made of? How is it powered?
     
  8. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Nice boat TAD,

    I mailed Paul Riccelli.
     

  9. jkeenan
    Joined: Feb 2010
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Taunton MA

    jkeenan New Member

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