Economical Sportfisherman?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by kapnD, Aug 28, 2010.

  1. kapnD
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    kapnD Senior Member

    I know, the words "sportfish" and "economy" traditionally dont fit together well, but in my circumstance, the fishing grounds start right outside of the head buoy, not 40 miles offshore, so an offshore capable boat of modern materials that has a single engine, cruises at 8 and tops out at 14 knots or so is just fine.
    So far, Michael Kastens Rhumb Runner 48 has caught my eye, as well as Tad Roberts Passagemaker, both sensible hulls that can move with grace and economy, as long as they are kept reasonably light.
    Any other hulls that I could study that might do this job?
    Thanks, Don

















    p
     
  2. jefflee2k
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    jefflee2k Junior Member

    seaworthy + economy = rigid inflatable
     
  3. Carteret
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    Carteret Senior Member

    Do you plan to build or buy and how much cockpit space and fuel do you wish to cary?
     
  4. mydauphin
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    mydauphin Senior Member

    I know a more than a few of people with very well rigged kayak and canoes. Yes, outriggers, motors, electronics, the whole bit. They go out a few miles and catch fish almost as big as boat.
     
  5. kapnD
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    kapnD Senior Member

    To get the boat I'm interested in, I'm pretty sure it will be a build, or maybe a major rebuild of an existing trawler type. I have wondered what kind of numbers could be wrung out of a modern sportfish if it were repowered with small economical diesels and generally lightened up?
    Cockpit space is a must, in my current rig, I have about 13' of open deck, almost big enough to drag a monster marlin clear on board.
    Fuel is a big question, most of my fishing around home is day trips, so 200gal is enough for a week or so, but moving to a bigger and more economical hull, I might be able to carry more fuel and have to fill up less, and longer trips will become a more viable option too.
    Rhumb Runner will go 2500 miles on 600 gallons, putting Mexico and South Pacific Islands onto the radar!
     
  6. mydauphin
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    mydauphin Senior Member

    Fishing machines vary greatly depending on usage. Depends on the fish you are going to catch and speed you need to get where the fish are. Take the following boats;
    a. 17' Flats Boat
    b. 20' Open fisherman
    c. 35' Open Fisherman
    d. 45' Sports fisher
    e. 70' fishing trawler

    All are fishing boats, different fish, range, speed, capacity. And of course budget. So what do you really need or want?
     
  7. kapnD
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    kapnD Senior Member




    Mydauphin,
    I am talking sportfishing for pelagics in open ocean, frequently rough, windy conditions, and in my first post mentioned a couple of hulls that showed promise for my criterea, which are economical operation and seakeeping abilities in 50' max loa.
    I am particularly keen on Michael Kasten's Rhumb Runner 48, at least from the waterline down. http://www.kastenmarine.com/rhumb_runner.htm
    I am looking for suggestions of other hulls that I can study.
    Thanks for your interest, Don
     
  8. Vulkyn
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    Vulkyn Senior Member

  9. Carteret
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    Carteret Senior Member

    Sounds like a Carolina Sport Fisher would fit the bill. Around 36' with a single diesel engine. Make sure your have a high bow, cockpit floor about 6" above the water line, good fish box, fighting chair, and Marlin door.
     
  10. Pierre R
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    Pierre R Senior Member

    Let's see, you mention the need to only go outside the harbor to get the the fishing grounds as a means to justify going slow and in the next paragraph you mention passagemakers and long distance boats and in the same post mention affordable.

    I don't think you have though enough about what it is that you really want to do and therefore cannot nail down the boat that would be suitable.

    Right now a gas guzzling old sportfish would fit the bill if you are just going outside the markers. You won't burn enough in fuel to worry about the captial costs of a better boat. That is what affordable is all about. When you are ready to travel sell it and get a different boat.
     

  11. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Well put.

    The mentioned Rhumb Runner seems to be a sensible sort of compromise though.
    TAD´s Passagemaker light is even more economical to operate.
    The BR Atlantic is "semi" in almost every aspect mentioned here.

    Regards
    Richard
     
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