easy, fast to build multihull with simple rig

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by sailor305, May 15, 2012.

  1. sailor305
    Joined: May 2012
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    Location: Miami Beach FL

    sailor305 future cat builder

    Hi all,

    I'm currently on the market to get affordable plans for an easy and fast to build multihull 35' + which should be build in southeast Asia.
    It should be a live aboard long term cruiser mainly for the Pacific.
    Due my budget is tough I have to follow KISS.
    I found plans which may fit around 1k already.
    However the drive train makes me headache due its higher costs than the hulls.
    Auxiliary power can be done by two outboard engines but the rig?

    I hope somebody can recommend something simple and easy single handed. I have a batten less main or a main less one, two roller furler sails, gaff ketch or similar in mind which reduced expensive mast(s) and winches.
    I'm wondering why bamboo poles aren't used as masts. They are as strong as steel but have some flexibility and with less than 50' it should work?

    Of course it would be appreciated to get the plans of the boat together with the rig.

    Finally, I'd like to add that I'm 6'4" and standing headroom is a must for a live aboard.

    I'm no longer young and I've to start building soon.

    Thank you
     
  2. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    Do you have a idea of the total budget that your willing to allocate to the plans and construction?
     
  3. sailor305
    Joined: May 2012
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    sailor305 future cat builder

    Hi Corley,
    thanks for your quick response.

    There is a guy in your country building for $700-$1000 per ft sail ready.
    Adding the same amount for engines, electronics, safety and more it comes to the budget figures I have in mind.
    In Southeast Asia labor is cheap and I can hire guys for sanding and fairing to shorten building time.
     
  4. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    Well, Wharram catamarans come to mind they are about as simple as they get and can use mostly local materials for construction. They are well proven and simple, low resale though but that may not matter to you.

    I have heard of some composite catamarans that use local timbers for core material made to Mark Pescott designs but they would not be anywhere near the proposed budget.
     
  5. sailor305
    Joined: May 2012
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    Location: Miami Beach FL

    sailor305 future cat builder

    Wharram design

    Corley,

    I just had a look on a 42'1995 redone Wharram here in my area fully equipped for long term cruising here in my state asking 65k. Not bad I guess, however its 17 years old and it depends all on the original builder. I'm trying to get more pics and information.
    Beside that I like the Wharram rigs and dislike the open bridge deck which isn't fun when weather is nasty.
    A simple composite design with hull access from the deck house seems to me more comfy.
     
  6. masalai
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: cruising, Australia

    masalai masalai

    Hi sailor305,
    Maybe the best option available under the present economic climate is to look for a "distressed sale", not distressed boat but financially distressed owner, With the Au$ almost par with the US$ looking here http://www.thecoastalpassage.com/ in their for sale section (it is a free monthly electronic magazine), http://www.thecoastalpassage.com/multihulls.html - - or - - mine about Au$350,000...
    http://yachthub.com/list/used-boats-yachts-for-sale.html - - where the listing shows - -
    catamarans up to 25ft (17) 26ft - 30ft (30) 31ft - 35ft (87) 36ft - 40ft (161) - - http://yachthub.com/catlist/used/yachts-for-sale/sail-catamarans/36-40ft/11?order_by=price_asc - for - 41ft - 50ft (250) over 50ft (70)
    trimarans up to 30ft (26) over 30ft (43) may be useful for you to peruse...
     
  7. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    Richard Woods is a member on these forums so it would be interesting to hear his thoughts and recommendations on a suitable design. Richard's designs would come closer to what your after and some of his hard chine designs would be an economical build. Composite is tough to keep the price low, ply would generally be less expensive for a given length and volume boat.

    Richards site is:

    http://www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
  8. village idiot
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: australia

    village idiot Junior Member

  9. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Location: UK, USA and Canada

    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    I think you are saying you have a budget of USD35000 to build a 35ft ocean going catamaran in ply/epoxy. Is that right???

    Many people would say that was impossible, but it can be done. But from day 1 you must keep it simple and accept compromises.

    Having said that, it doesn't really matter what design you chose, the basic hull shell will cost the same. All will need about 100 sheets of 9mm ply plus glass, epoxy and timber. And the empty weight will be between 2.5-3.5T

    So you should chose the design on features that you like, not on any "cheap to build" claims.

    I have four suitable designs in that size range. Mira, Flica, Romany and Mirage. There is a Romany ashore at Fort Pierce and a Mirage in Ft Lauderdale. I think the Romany would probably suit you best.

    I would agree with the "distressed sale" comments. If I was building on a budget I would certainly buy a used aluminium mast and boom. They last forever so are available very cheap. You don't need more than two winches to handle all sails. Get non selftailers and you'll find they are cheap. Used headsails will work (never worth recutting them though) but used mainsails tend to be unsuitable for multihulls

    A single 9.9hp high thrust outboard is enough for a 35ft catamaran. Get the simplest chartplotter, and a fishfinder. LED AA battery powered lights. Two burner cooker. Hand pumped water

    Forget about bamboo. A solid wood mast would be better than bamboo. You'd need something around 8in diameter and will spend a lot of money getting one off fittings made to attach shrouds, goosenecks etc. Only use one mast, its the cheapest, simplest and most efficient.

    Hope that helps a bit

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
  10. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    A quiet word: for a 35 foot multihull there are ways and ways to get below 2500kgs ... and the big gain is go to tensioned ply in thinner gauges, like 5 or 6mm, then glass, even carbon the specific areas under high loads. Uni directional carbon is not overly expensive and is wonderful stuff for reinforcement. But if that is too expensive, go to more and heavier laminates of glass. Bending lighter ply produces stiff panels and will save huge weight compared to flat panel, thicker ply hull construction.
    Some will throw their hands up in horror reading this, but there are numbers of long lived multihulls; the Gougeons' Adagio is an excellent example, going on to half a Century now. Agreed this is probably a more minimalist boat to what you have in mind ... but you get the story.
    I could go on, building curved decks, mast, boom, boards and rudders and so on - all dumb weight can be sidestepped with some careful thought and construction techniques, yet you can still end up with a long lived and strong boat.
     

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  11. guzzis3
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    guzzis3 Senior Member

    I assume this is material cost ? I also assume you don't put any value on your labor ?

    Building isn't your cheapest option given what you can buy a boat for currently. If you want to build then build but don't think your going to knock out a 35' cat in a couple of weekends.

    If you do build you could do a LOT worse than choosing one of Mr Woods designes.

    I know you want a cat but that 41' corinthian recently on ebay was not a bad option.

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/multihulls/corinthian-trimaran-24107.html

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/SAIL...110873522361?pt=Sailboats&hash=item19d093b0b9

    Depending on what they exprect to get for it. Then there is

    http://www.trademe.co.nz/motors/boats-marine/yachts-sail-boats/moored-boats/auction-385578808.htm

    http://www.boatpoint.com.au/boats-for-sale/boatdetails.aspx?R=11657591

    Of course there are lots of other options all over the place including closer to you.
     
  12. farjoe
    Joined: Oct 2003
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    farjoe Senior Member

    Gary,

    with 4mm plywood, one tape layer at the top and one at the bottom of the keel joint is enough to allow you to torture the ply without the joint caving in.

    How may layers would you recommend in this area when using 6mm ply?

    In terms of technique, would you go for one central joint, joining the 2 side panels as in the Tornado or would you go for 2 joints, joining 2 side panels and 1 bottom panel as is done on the Blade wooden Catamaran? The latter would allow you to place more volume way down low as is being done on more recent cats including the AC45's

    regards

    joe
     
  13. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Location: UK, USA and Canada

    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    To Gary

    an even quieter word

    From the tone of the OP post I don't think he was looking for anything except a ruggedly built sheet ply boat

    Otherwise, yes, I agree, you can have a shell weight less than 2.5T on a 35ft boat. But on the other hand you don't want hulls that are too fine as those don't offer much interior space so there is no point in going too light.

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
  14. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    To be honest, Farjoe, I've never tried bending 6mm - 2.5, 3, 4 and 5mm, yes - but if I remember correctly, the Gougeons built Adagio in 6. I'd go back to their great book and re-read their tension ply chapter because there are a lot of shots of Adagio's build there; obviously it can be done. However that is a stiff ply and from my experience, it is better to go to thinner gauges and then, (and you also achieve fuller hulls from the thinner ply, as Richard implies) lay on more laminates of glass cloth, that is if you're worrying about strength, abrasion resistance etc.
    The way I connect keel to ply is to glue, then staple, then cove, no glass taping, and let it all cure before bending. It is not pure tension ply building because I have a thin keelson that I attach the ply to, sort of half traditional, half tension. It is easier that way if you're working alone.
     

  15. Silver Raven
    Joined: Oct 2011
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    Location: Far North Queensland, Australia

    Silver Raven Senior Member

    Still looking??

    Gooday there, from an older man - ex-pat Canuck - now in OZ. There's much more to your questions than you could possibly appreciate - IMHO. Since you have choosen to stop people getting in touch with you directly - which is your choice - I wish you luck & am aware that there are several ways to get what you're after & at the price you are willing to afford. Good luck - contact me if you wish or don't - your call there. jamesaviculture@hotmail,com . ex-yacht builder/repairer - who's going cruising in SE Asia on an affordable multihull - built in SE Asia. Again have a great ride in life, ciao, jj
     
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