easy(est) way to make a fiberglass hull?

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Liighthead, Oct 28, 2012.

  1. Liighthead
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    Liighthead Junior Member

    was wondering what the best way is to go about it?
    most likley just a single boat of that size/shape

    my first idea was something like a fiberglass speaker box.
    wooden frame, wrap in fabric type stuff ( nice and tight ) then fiberglass over the top of that?

    or make a wooden boat and fiberglass over that.. ?:p
     
  2. Herman
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    Herman Senior Member

    The easiest way depends on your skill, your possibilities, and not the least, the demands on the boat, or the desired structure.

    In that way your question can be compared to: how long is a string?
     
  3. Liighthead
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    Liighthead Junior Member

    haha ahh true its about that long o.o

    well in a canoe/kayak type boat
     
  4. pistnbroke
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    pistnbroke I try

    If the question is really what is the easyest way to make a boat then its stitch and glue . OR the easiest way is just go buy a second hand one..depends on how big you want it .....
     
  5. FAST FRED
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    FAST FRED Senior Member

    For a simple custom of very light weight , you might consider the Kelsall KSS build system.
     
  6. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Fiberglass structures are lighter and stronger when they are of compound curves. Flat panels need to be rather thick and heavy. Fiberglassing over wood is a very common method and you can find many designs, some free, for canoes and kayaks.
     
  7. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I wouldn't consider a "bagged" 'glass foam sandwanch method, particularly easy for the novice, even if it is flat panel to start.

    The simplest method for the novice is over a male mold, where you can just drape the fabric, wet it out, roll it down and pop it off. The mold can be cheap foam, stringers over molds, whatever that's cheap and easy to work. Of course fairing a male molded hull is laborious, but welcome to 'glass hull building, as it'll need to be fair regardless of the method. In other words a female mold has to be faired before the fabrics go in or a male mold gets done after wards, same deal, though it's easier to fair a male product than a female.
     
  8. Harry Josey
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    Harry Josey Junior Member

    The easiest way is to borrow someones boat and use it as a male mould. You will have to remove all the fittings and make sure you can remove the glass shell when you're done. If the shape won't allow this you might be able to mould your shell in 2 parts and join them later. Failing this your first idea is good. Build a light frame of stringers over a couple of temporary frames cover it with fabric such as muslin. Paint with starch to shrink and stiffen the fabric. Apply fibreglass to the outside and inside over the stringers. The result is strong and light.
     
  9. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Splashing is unethical and often illegal. Furthermore, most of us in this forum have a strong bad opinion of it.
     
  10. Liighthead
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    Liighthead Junior Member

    haha yeah guess stich and glue proably easyest way
    i guess ill wait and see. :) thanks for your help everyone not 100% on anything yet but yeah haha will see :)
     
  11. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There's only a few advantages to taped seam (stitch and glue) construction. The first is a fairly simple assembly of the plywood parts, assuming a CNC kit, other wise there's no advantage, because you have to loft and cut. Second is the relatively fair surfaces a plywood build can bring. Other then the seams, large portions of the surface are reasonably fair, because of the broad expanse of plywood panels. This can save some time fairing, which to the novice builder can take as long as assembly of the raw hull shell.

    I don't see a real speed advantage with taped seam if it's sheathed, but do if only the seams are taped.

    I think the fastest 'glass build would be foam panels, used much like a taped seam build, except it's a mold for the fabric. The foam is cheap and easy to cut and assemble, plus the broad panels are relatively fair, which will help once the fabric is down. Layup the hull shell and pop out the cheap, disposable foam and scrap wood mold. If the plans show a female mold, you can achieve a high level of finish, right out of the mold, though most plans will show a male mold, which requires more fairing.

    In short, the right set of plans is the real ticket Liighthead. A poorly developed set of plans will slow you down to no end, but a well executed set of plans can make your life a lot easier.
     

  12. bpw
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    bpw Senior Member

    Plywood or skin on frame kayaks are generally quite a bit lighter than fiberglass ones.

    Makes the effort of home-building in glass a bit of a non-starter.
     
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