Early US SWATH vessel name ???

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by DCockey, Jun 16, 2020.

  1. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Does anyone recall the name of a SWATH vessel which was built for the US Navy in the 1970's? My recollection is it was built for the US Navy or US Coast Guard as a proof of concept but was nominally a harbor patrol vessel or similar due to funding issues.
     
  2. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Kaimalino
     
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  3. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    You may find THIS of interest too.
     
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  4. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    And if you want info on Kaimalino's design look up the Hydrodynamic Design of a S3 Semi-submerged Ship, Lang, Ninth Symposium: Naval Hydrodynamic, Volume 1, Unconventional Ships and Ocean Engineering, Paris 1972, ONR/ACR - 203
     
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  5. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Thanks for the name and video link. I first heard of Kaimalino at the 1979 AIAA/SNAME Advanced Marine Vessel conference in Baltimore. Around 10 years later while living in Rochester Hills, Michigan I watched a video about Kaimalino (possibly the one Ad Hoc linked to) on the community TV channel. I don't recall the details of the link to Rochester Hills but I recall someone who had worked on it, possibly as a contractor, had relocated to Rochester Hills. Today I saw a reference to the US Navy's "first SWATH vessel" but it was about the first commissioned SWATH vessel. Correction - the vessel I saw a reference to was not commissioned.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2020
  6. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Are you referring to the Halcyon Offshore Support Vessel?
     
  7. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    The reference I saw was in an announcement for a SNAME webinar by Barry Tibbetts:
    T-AGOS 19 (USNS Victorious) was the lead ship in a class of special mission ships designed during the peak of the Cold War. The need was urgent so only eight months were available for the design, followed by competitively selecting the shipbuilder in only six months. It was also the Navy’s first SWATH (small waterplane area twin hull) ship. Being the first, there were many technical challenges, little time to resolve them, and none of the design tools had been validated full scale.
     
  8. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Doh!!.. of course, totally slipped my mind on those T-Agos 19-23

    Nice image HERE too.
     
  9. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    You mean Duplus in 1969? She was converted to a cat soon after launch due to poor performance....all the real research was done 1967-72 down at the OMB in Escondido (don't make me drag out my references). Kaimalino (circa 1972) was really the first competent SWATH. And USS Victorious (T-AGOS-19 circa 1985) the first main fleet unit (CCGS FREDERICK G. CREED (circa 1987) doesn't really count, she was built as a spectator boat for the 1988 AC but couldn't make spec).

    Edit: X-post while digging out my senior design project....
     
  10. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    No the Halcyon - see attached poorly scanned in ...also written about by QM Lewis in 1985. at SNAME meeting.
     

    Attached Files:

  11. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    When I presented my senior design project at UofM, May 1984, 2 MSC managers and a shipbuilder were there...My design and T-AGOS-19 were almost exact copies....It's what the data pushed you to, as I have said before, there are only 3 sizes of SAWTHs...
     
  12. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    All the small SWATHs at that time were failures, you can't build the crossdeck/strut joint strong enough without dropping the crossdeck too low and having slamming issues. Lots of cracking and overweight issues.
     
  13. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    I beg to differ.
    It is all about identifying the load paths and applying appropriate fatigue values to the main areas of concern.
     
  14. kleenbreeze
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    kleenbreeze Junior Member

    Don't recall it's name but have seen it docked in Point Loma naval base, it is probably still there. Last time I saw it one hull was partially submerged and it was listing badly.
     

  15. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    David

    You may be interested to watch the webinar on the T-AGOS 19 tomorrow, noted HERE.
     
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