Dutch Barge long distance cruisers

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Greenseas2, Apr 18, 2006.

  1. Greenseas2
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    Greenseas2 Senior Member

    Uses

    Within the scope of this thread, we are discussing the utility of the Dutch barge design as being a roomy, low powered and economical live aboard for cruisinmg mostly inland waterways, rivers and canals of the US. Your expertise in the design of a small (40 to 50 foot) cruising version would be quite valuable to the discussion. Choice of building materials is also important to bring the viability of having a Dutch "style" barge to those of medium income. As in Europe, there are many who live year around on converted and replica barges and are quite happy with their environment. Here, we're seeking to bring the same lifestyle and vessels to the US waterways.
     
  2. SeaSpark
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    SeaSpark -

    Coaster

    We call these kind of ships coasters, yes we borrowed it from the Enlisch language.

    Included pictures of a typical old and a modern dutch coaster.
     

    Attached Files:

  3. SeaSpark
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    SeaSpark -

    Economical cruiser.

    Greenseas i completely agree with you, there is a need for the kind of vessel you are interested in, also in Holland.

    When i have time for it i will make a design proposal in multi chine construction.
    It would be helpfull if you could find some pictures of the kind of features you like on a boat like this.
     
  4. Greenseas2
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    Greenseas2 Senior Member

    Thank you.

    I will try to come up with a concise narrative for a motor barge within the next few days, and I do appreciate your help.
     
  5. Sander Rave
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    Sander Rave Senior Member

    Maybe a bit late Seaspark,
    Replying to a previous remark you made about the Northsea, I wouldn't do it anyway ;-)

    6bf on the Waddensea isn't comfortable but doable, even with an relative low powered (kromhout diesel) barge.

    Biggest problem is the rolling and maybe even more, on high seas the windows will be blown out. (at least on the typical old style barges, the steering house is sertanly not made seaworthy)
     
  6. Greenseas2
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    Greenseas2 Senior Member

    Common Sense navigation

    As with any other vessel, you have to know what the reasonable limits of the vessel are and the seas that she will be safe in. Granted, many of the pilothouses are fold down and have large window areas that are vulnerable, but in knowing that, you operate in more moderate sea conditions. With any boat design we can introduce extreme sea conditons where the integrity of design will be jeopardized. In the US, even inlets on the east and west coast can have impassable sea conditions, but most knowledgable skippers wait until conditions improve before crossing them.
     
  7. SeaSpark
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    SeaSpark -

  8. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    I love the old one....
     
  9. bransonboats
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    bransonboats Junior Member

    Have a look at www.bransonboats.com we design steel dutch barges that are available as precut kits or DXF files for cutting locally. Also doing passagemaker type boats as well.

    Although some of our barges can be rated as cat B of the RCD my thoughts are that there are better shaped hulls that are more seakindly than a Dutch Barge.
     
  10. bransonboats
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    bransonboats Junior Member

    Dutch Barge Steel Kits

    Have a look at www.bransonboats.com we design steel dutch barges that are available as precut kits or DXF files for cutting locally. Also doing passagemaker type boats as well.

    Although some of our barges can be rated as cat B of the RCD my thoughts are that there are better shaped hulls that are more seakindly than a Dutch Barge.

    Nick
     
  11. Greenseas2
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    Greenseas2 Senior Member

    Thank you

    Thanks for the information. I have seen branson boats, but wasn't ware that they offered files for local steel cutting.
     
  12. nickbranson
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    nickbranson Branson Boat Design

    Steel kit cutting files

    Yes, we have supplied DXF cutting files as far away as Australia! At lot easier than arranging shipping and road transport. Getting back to the question of Dutch Barge seaworthiness we have designed two Passagemaker type vessels with a low enough airdraft for the French inland waterways. Loads of accomodation yet very seaworthy. By the way our website address has been changed to www.dutch-barges.net [​IMG]
     
  13. RCardozo
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    RCardozo RCardozo

    Jeez where to begin. I own a Dutch Sailing Barge built in 1893. Barges were originally designed as inland cargo vessels. Their shape is due to a number of factors. A flat bottom could be beached loaded and floated. Lee boards left a large interior space for maximum blockage of cargo. The blunt rounded stern and bow gave boyancy to plow thru heavier seas. They punch through the waves less than cleave them. Kind of a wet process. Still they were inland boats for the most part. Some are of heavier construction for heavier seas. Originally sail powered the mast could be lowered to get under bridges and sell your cargo in town. When combustion engines came on the scene they were added. \you do not want to be on a flat bottomed boat in a following sea off the aft quarter of any size. It will roll. The new replicas are really selling the size and modifying the motorized versions that developed after combustion engines were developed. This means sharper bows, more v hulls etc.
     
  14. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    Hi, Cardozo!
    Could you post pictures of your barge?
    Cheers.
     

  15. Greenseas2
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    Greenseas2 Senior Member

    Flat bottom barges

    The intial intent of the thread was to get input on an economic design of a Dutch style barge that could be built reasonably with any number of materials. The flat bottom barge will naturally roll in a seasway, but is probably the best for an relatively amateur builder. Any number of building mediums can be used from steel to strip plank to ferrocement. The end goal is to build a long distance capable Dutch style barge for predominently inland liveaboard travel. Few other designs have the internal volume that would provide exceptional living space, tankage and all of the other variables within a single hull form. A 5 to 6 knot speed would be acceptable in most cases as people who live on barges are generally not in a hurry to get anywhere. The words "Ocean capable" and " Barge" are seldom used together even though a modicum of seaworthiness is desired.
     
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