Dutch Barge long distance cruisers

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Greenseas2, Apr 18, 2006.

  1. mo´s
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: berlin / germany

    mo´s Junior Member

    will,

    thanks for your welcome. i try to explain, because my english isn´t the best at all.
    there are three reasons for modelling the bow like this.

    - better stability in running straight

    - space for mounting (a) bow thruster (s)

    - space for water tanks. i want to build a closed tanksystem with four
    tanks, one in each corner of the boat.

    when the floorplan is finished i´ll place it here for better understanding.

    tom
     
  2. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Classic Dutch Barge

    Colibri

    Now I could live on something like this....maybe even a smaller version. I do like the sunny/lounging deck up topsides.

    Go to their website.....http://www.bargecolibri.com/index.php.....and have a look at the photo album
     

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  3. colinstone
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    colinstone Junior Member

  4. KnottyBuoyz
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    KnottyBuoyz Provocateur & Raconteur

    Kei is an absolutely amazing looking ship Colin. She'd be right at home on this side of the pond on any one of the NA canals! Of all the boats to lust over for our retirement livaboard, Kei would be the one! I fear she'd be well beyond our means though! It actually surprises me that there aren't any here already. Too many tin house boats I'm afraid.
     
  5. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    That's quite a web reference you have there. Regrettable I don't have more time to review it at the moment.

    I also have a supreme design I saved, that is hiding around somewhere. I will post it when I find it


    I'm not so convinced of this. I think a lot of the potential clients for this style vessel would wecome the ruggedness of steel construction. And in a 'full-displacement' design such as these, one could use thicker bottom plating, thus less framing (less welding & more interior volume), as it is not required to be of a lighter construction to maximize freight carrying capability.
     
  6. colinstone
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    colinstone Junior Member

    ......would wecome the ruggedness of steel construction.

    I misjudged a corner on the River Thames - basically was not paying attention - and we smashed sideways into the quarter a moored waterway maintenance barge at some speed - 3/4kts probably. Hit just fwd of midships and bounced off. Mrs S, not onboard at the time, only noticed a slight scuff on the paint when the river was higher in Jan/Feb!!! A plastic hull would have been seriously damaged/holed.
     
  7. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Richard Branson's barge

    Somehow I remember seeing some pictures of a barge that Sir Richard Branson once keep (as an unofficial office or small escape I believe). So as I tried to 'google it' and I ran into these sites:

    http://www.ecoboot.nl/artikelen/WeblogTiesFloatingCommunities.html.php

    http://blog.thomasdolby.com/?p=311
    on a canal barge in Little Venice. I dug around a bit and found this pic of it. It was a few boats down from where Richard Branson used to live.

    http://perkins-sabre.com/PR/News/OLD-Index-2005.cfm
    June 2005 - Barge builder continues the Perkins Sabre tradition ... The M.V. Edwardian, which was built for Sir Richard Branson 20 years ago, ...

    If I remember correctly it had a real comfortable interior. (Maybe it was an interior design mag issue, or lifestyle mag issue I saw). Anyone know of more info??
     
  8. xarax

    xarax Previous Member

    How to reduce rolling motion of a barge.

    Attach an uninflated RIB tube along the cabin floor of your barge. Fill the tube with water whenever you confront waves that induce excessive rolling.
     
  9. wightmage
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    wightmage Junior Member

    Hi All,

    Not trying to kick a hornets nest here. The thread was to explore the potential of a Dutch Barge as a long distance cruiser.

    I am finding it difficult to believe that Human inventivness cannot come up with a set of steps that could be taken to make an old Dutch Barge capable of navigating the same course that yachts that are 20-50ft in length do each year as part of the ARC rally.

    Even I can understand that the flex of the hul can be controlled via strengthening using interior structure work. The Coach house can also be modified.

    If an old Mississippi Steam paddle riverboat can be boarded up and towed from California via the Pamana Canal back to the Mississippi then there has to be some potential.

    I am not inviting a flame session. What I am asking is very simple.

    What needs to be done to the boat as a minimum to allow it to make the voyage?
     
  10. FAST FRED
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    FAST FRED Senior Member

    "To be honest its uniqueness would allow me to potentialy chater and get a good income out of it. Its about investment really I guess."

    In the USA the Jones Act makes the use of a non US built hull almost impossible in commercial service.

    YOU can NOT take passengers fore hire , not even 6 which can be done in a US built cardboard box.

    You can give the charterer the keys , and watch him sail off into the sunset , but without YOU aboard as "guest" or "adviser".

    There IS a chance, if you're well politically connected, to purchase a "Special Bill" ( BIG BUCK$) that will permit this , but its probably cheaper to build a replica in the US.

    We "Have the best congress money can by" Will Rogers

    "What needs to be done to the boat as a minimum to allow it to make the voyage?"

    Planning, prayer and lots of luck with the weather.

    Lots of boats very unsubstantial boats gather each year and get blown downwind to the Windward islands. Join the group and hope.

    FF
     
  11. ted655
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    ted655 Senior Member

    We looked for 3 years to find ANY sort of Dutch Barge here in the USA. We gave up & bought a houseboat.
    We briefly considered tring to leave Ireland & hit a "window" of calm North Atlantic. We found nobody willing to help with the plan. They all considered it suicide to try.
    I am at a loss to explain why there is no American builders. There IS a market. In steel, not GRP! One thing we don't need here is 1 more "cheap glass boat".
    The exchange rate is against us now also.

    The flat bottom is mainly what keeps the boat from being a safe cruiser. A detachable keel is needed. Unbolt it for calm water or ship it back to the builder after use. Windows need shutters AND... yes a stronger backbone than normal. More power also.
    The cabins are perfect for a self righting roof chamber. Next stop--- Nova Scotia!!
     
  12. colinstone
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    colinstone Junior Member

  13. Pericles
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    Location: Heights of High Wycombe, not far from River Thames

    Pericles Senior Member

    $700 would purchase a set of plans to build a 45' Teign Motor Barge suitable for US water. See half way down the page below:

    http://www.selway-fisher.com/Mcover30.htm

    At the bottom of the page is the 41' Humber Steel Barge for $560.

    The plans can be modified to lengthen the vessels I believe. Food for thought?

    Pericles
     
  14. ted655
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    ted655 Senior Member

    Thamks, I'd forgot Selway.
    The wheel house/salon is farther aft than I like. A mid position make hamdling easier.
    Are their plans popular? Anyone ever build from them? Full size, lofting or ??
     

  15. michael60
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    michael60 Junior Member

    Wouldn't aluminum be an extremely difficult material for the amateur builder to use? I mean, welding steel skilfully enough for a maritime environment is something I would find daunting and I believe welding aluminum is far more difficult than steel. Am I wrong?

    Also, a cockpit/swim platform/garage for toys is good for having fun but is it as seaworthy as a high stern with even higher freeboard?

    I guess we are on different wavelengths here. I thought this thread was about contributing ideas for an easily built/affordable Dutch Barge. This far into the thread, I have enjoyed some of the exchanges bar one that took a cheap, rather ignorant, shot at an aviator. I for one am hoping to see some useful and constructive results here.

    I have long been considering a Dutch Barge design from Euroship Services, NL, but cannot seriously contemplate doing the welding myself and then piling my family aboard and going to sea - even on inland lakes and large estuaries. I favour wood/epoxy for very many reasons, not least of which is that I feel fully capable of building a seaworthy boat in that medium.

    Ah well, onwards and upwards ... :)

    Regards

    michael60
     
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