Dry Glass Recycling

Discussion in 'Materials' started by fpjeepy05, Oct 21, 2020.

  1. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 4,320
    Likes: 748, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    Probably going offtrack a bit. Can you explain how you are cutting the carbon and what you are laying up on?

    like across the weave or what or random

    I have aramid carbon combined; so wondering how/if.
     
    Mark C. Schreiter likes this.
  2. Mark C. Schreiter
    Joined: Nov 2020
    Posts: 52
    Likes: 10, Points: 8
    Location: Tampa, Fl

    Mark C. Schreiter Junior Member

    Of course, Ill back up a little first, most of the carbon fabric I've worked with will have a sewing stitch line (not sure what you'd call it) on the outside edges that seems to hold the weave together. i've been cutting the stitch lines completely off the roll with a pair of heavy duty hand operated scissors. then you can pull out the individual filaments of carbon. ill pull out maybe 15-20 filaments and line them up in one hand and start cutting with the other.

    the trick is to cut them as uniform as possible and try not to mess with them after they're cut. the cut pieces sort of stay together in their respective filaments.

    to make the panels, ill have two square pieces of melamine that I wax and PVA. ill lay down a couple layers of cloth, either carbon or fiberglass then wet it out. sprinkle my pre cut carbon onto the wet cloth and either use a foam roller or a squeegee to spread out a little more resin. put down a layer of peel ply then the other piece of melamine on top ot the peel ply, next breather on top of that and vacuum it all down. the second piece of melamine acts as a caul plate and not having bleeder cloth keeps it a little resin rich so you can sand the snot out of it. and the bonus is that you can sand just about as much as you want and not have to worry about messing up the weave. even if you sand through the chopped carbon all you do is cut up some more and add it to the part with a little resin.
     
  3. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 4,320
    Likes: 748, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    Wonder if it'd work with aramid hybrid.
     
  4. Mark C. Schreiter
    Joined: Nov 2020
    Posts: 52
    Likes: 10, Points: 8
    Location: Tampa, Fl

    Mark C. Schreiter Junior Member

    I’m sure you could figure something out.

    I never met a Kevlar that I liked though, at least for a repairing standpoint.
     
  5. fpjeepy05
    Joined: Jan 2010
    Posts: 248
    Likes: 14, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 31
    Location: Hubert, NC

    fpjeepy05 Senior Member

    I like your carbon panels. It's a different look, but not as much carbon around as there is glass.

    Also for my artificial reef idea, I guess they make AR glass for use in alkaline concrete. Regular e-glass degrades. The question I can't find an answer to is how much. Any construction guys out there have an answer for that?
     
    Mark C. Schreiter likes this.
  6. KD8NPB
    Joined: Mar 2018
    Posts: 95
    Likes: 19, Points: 8
    Location: South Carolina

    KD8NPB Junior Member

    fallguy likes this.
  7. fpjeepy05
    Joined: Jan 2010
    Posts: 248
    Likes: 14, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 31
    Location: Hubert, NC

    fpjeepy05 Senior Member

    I've talked with them. It won't grind dry fabric. But cool none the less.
     

  8. KD8NPB
    Joined: Mar 2018
    Posts: 95
    Likes: 19, Points: 8
    Location: South Carolina

    KD8NPB Junior Member

    why not just wet out your scraps and use them on a project? We used to do that monthly at a boatbuilder I worked for.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.