Drift Boat Wet core

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by Codym21, Jun 28, 2014.

  1. Codym21
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    Codym21 New Member

    I recently purchased a 96 Hyde drift boat and have been trying to repair it. The core is soaking wet and has been drying for over two months. I have sanded out most of the cracks but the whole core still is wet. The previous owner left it outside uncovered. I have drilled small holes in the floor to help dry it out and this is not working. Can anyone give me suggestions or ideas on how to fix this.
    Thanks
     
  2. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    It would help if you said what it's built of (wood, glass) and what the core is (foam, balsa).

    Re-reading I assume it's glass. It's probably easiest to rip out the foam from the inside, replace it and re-glass the floor.
     
  3. Codym21
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    Codym21 New Member

    The core is foam and im not sure what type. I can get pictures if that would help. The boat itself is made out of fiberglass
     
  4. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    Yes, pictures always help. It would be best if they were of the inside of your actual boat showing accessibility of the bottom. Can seats and other stuff be removed?
     
  5. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Bananas

    If the foam is styro you can make it just about disappear by introducing acetone. Once it is out of the way you can refill with 2 part foam.
     
  6. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Bananas

  7. Tungsten
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    Tungsten Senior Member

    A hyde boat has no core,solid glass a mix of WR and matt.Its a river drift boat it has no flotation.
    My guess is the gel coat is worn off and the glass has absorbed water.

    Again just a guess as far as I know hyde never made a cored drift boat.
     
  8. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    I don't know anything about them, but....

    http://www.drakemag.com/message-boards/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=15405&start=0

    .
     
  9. Tungsten
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    Tungsten Senior Member

    Well as far as I know and I've looked at a lot of them both Hyde and clacka build the same way.Different then what Drake says.

    There could have been an off year where they tried foam core or some of the US boats maybe different then what I see here in Canada but I doubt it.

    Back to what the OP is asking,when a drift boat reaches the state of "soggy" its dead, the time and money to fix would surpass a new one.

    I would use it as is until it completely falls apart.
     
  10. Tungsten
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    Tungsten Senior Member

    After some searching I found that yes indeed Hyde made a few foam cored boats around 1996,but I can't find anything that says what kind of foam.
     
  11. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    It sounds like they were chopper gun with foam core and cracks develop which soak the glass.

    It could be salvaged, I wouldn't put a lot of time and money into it, but without photos, and no response from the OP....
     
  12. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    I work with both builders, there are many differences in build methods.

    If the foam is soaked the only way to fix it is to remove and replace it. It doesn't need to be replaced if you don't want it there, but you may need to add a couple layers of glass to regain a little strength.
     
  13. Codym21
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    Codym21 New Member

    Thanks for all the responses, sorry its taken me so long to respond. I ended having to take out all of the foam because it was complety soaked.I am now trying to figure out if i should replace it with another kind of foam and glass over it or just glass over it without the foam.
     
  14. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    I'll just put in the usual admonition to make sure the hull is supported well and doesn't lose shape in it's weakened condition as once you redo the insides it will be locked in that shape.
     

  15. Tungsten
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    Tungsten Senior Member

    Sounds like a lot of work,how did you do it?Any pics?
     
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