Dreamboat - Matthieu Tarrit

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Frog4, Oct 22, 2011.

  1. Frog4
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    Frog4 Proletariat

  2. river runner
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    river runner baker

    It looks like they went out of their way to make it look futuristic, posslibly at the expense of more practical considerations. It will float, but it seems like the bow is pretty far out of the water, I don't see much room for propulsion, and I'm wondering about the stairs in back dragging in the water. On the plus side, the rectangular shape should maximize space.
     
  3. Jeremy Harris
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    Jeremy Harris Senior Member

    Very dumb bit of futuristic art, not not a boat design at all.

    Practically it couldn't be built to perform as a viable boat, for a host of reasons (fuel cells can't deliver the power needed for the performance, the hull design is about art, not performance, stability etc, etc). What's really dumb is this is posted on an "eco" web site - they should know better about what good eco design should look like.

    Electric power is viable for some types of boat (I have one), but getting enough power is the really big problem for anything other than a limited range and performance boat. Hull design needs to be optimised for very low resistance (like sailing and river boats from a hundred or so years ago), topside similarly need to be designed to minimise wind-induced resistance, from all aspects. Propulsion systems need tio be optimised for efficiency (and a jet drive is just about the very least efficient system you can have for this type of boat), motor choices need to reflect the hull power requirement and the limited energy that will be available from battery, fuel cell or renewable energy that might be available (wind or solar).
     
  4. FAST FRED
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    FAST FRED Senior Member

    "limited energy that will be available from battery,"

    For many that is a dockside power cord.

    In other words COAL POWERED.

    Onboard Diesel is far cleaner and range is unlimited , so whats the thrill of an underpowered boat with tiny range?

    Bragging rights ?
     
  5. Jeremy Harris
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    Jeremy Harris Senior Member

    This futuristic design just exemplifies everything that is wrong with our education system in this area. Students are being taught to design products where form takes precedence over function. A great example is a house I owned once that had "designer fittings", taps with smooth chrome barrels for handles and all the door handles (with twist latches) similarly with smooth chrome barrels. It was impossible to operate either with wet hands............

    This designer has created something that will handle appallingly badly (can you imagine docking the thing in a cross wind?) and that is totally impractical. Designing a boat that cannot work effectively as a boat is just bad design, no matter how futuristic it may look.
     
  6. daiquiri
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    It's a fine example of a pure styling excersize, with very little consideration of technical issues and ergonomics. The lack of the former two is what makes it just a styling game and not a more complete excersize in industrial design (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_design).

    Jeremy Harris said it all from the technical point of view. I'd just like to add that those grab rails are useless, since there's no way for anyone to climb up to the cabin roof and there's no side-deck.

    The chick suntanning on the roof in the 3rd pic was probably lifted there with a crane while the boat was in a marina. If she decides that she's had enough sun she'll probably have to jump into the water and then climb up the transom stairs to get back on board.

    Cheers
     
  7. Milehog
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    Milehog Clever Quip

    Aside from styling and ergonomics, could you imagine docking that vessel with the wind off the pier?
    I 'spose it could be named Wet Dream or, more likely, Lee Helm.
    And the chick on the roof? I'd like to think she has gecko feet.
     
  8. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    Add a cable at 'bow', and it can be used as mouse. For Cyclop's computer.
     
  9. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I will not speak to the styling, which frankly will look quite dated in just a few years, but the technology isn't particularly innovative, nor especially practical. So, where do you top off that fuel cell?
     
  10. Jeremy Harris
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    Jeremy Harris Senior Member

    Or where do you get hold of a fuel cell that will drive a few kW (or maybe tens of kW) of electric motors?
     
  11. Frog4
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    Frog4 Proletariat

    Telecomm industry has 10kW and up available, used in remote cellular tower locations. Minimum space req's are 2'x3'x4' for the fuel cell housing + space for a Type 4 tank or four filled with H2.
     
  12. Jeremy Harris
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    Jeremy Harris Senior Member

    But............ This is a 12m boat with a planing hull and twin jet drives! Just how is a puny 10 kW fuel cell going to come close to powering it?

    The things a joke, and wholly impractical given the technology we have available today.
     
  13. Frog4
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    Frog4 Proletariat

    what would you change?
     
  14. FMS
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    FMS Senior Member

    1.) the design isn't appropriate for how much power can be provided today by fuel cells
    2.) Aside from that, too much windage
    Large window openings aren't safe
    Difficult access to the top deck
    Where is the helm? Poor visibility and/or not a comfortable location
    Stern could be a good water scoop
     

  15. Frog4
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    Frog4 Proletariat

    so an ICE power plant would be a better fit for this ...

    not sure it's worse than designs with everything stern forward ...

    with todays safety glass and alternatives, would they still work?

    steps would be nice, along with appropriate railings

    more pics of the helm, etc: http://www.automotto.com/entry/the-dreamboat-concept-shows-eco-friendly-elegance/

    similar to an Opduwer
     
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